About the Blog:

Welcome to KF4LMT's Shack. I blog on scanning and monitoring, amateur radio, motor sports, history and books. I also post my amateur nature and wildlife photography.

Feel free to leave a comment or drop me a line at kf4lmt @ gmail.com.

Sorry, but I don't program scanners – it has led to too many requests that I just don't have time to accommodate.

Savannah Weather

Brunswick Weather

Upcoming Ham Radio Events

  • CARS Net 1 October 2017 at 21:30 – 22:00 Coastal Amateur Radio Society Weekly Net, 442.700+ Repeater
  • CARS Meeting 2 October 2017 at 20:00 – 21:00 White Bluff Presbyterian Church, 10710 White Bluff Road, Savannah, GA 31406, United States Coastal Amateur Radio Society Monthley Meeting White Bluff Presbyterian Church, 10710 White Bluff Road, Savannah, GA 31406, United States
  • California QSO Party 7 October 2017 – 8 October 2017
  • CARS Net 8 October 2017 at 21:30 – 22:00 Coastal Amateur Radio Society Weekly Net, 442.700+ Repeater
  • Arizona QSO Party 14 October 2017 – 15 October 2017 Arizona, USA
  • Pennsylvania QSO Party 14 October 2017 – 15 October 2017
  • CARS Net 15 October 2017 at 21:30 – 22:00 Coastal Amateur Radio Society Weekly Net, 442.700+ Repeater
  • Illinois QSO Party 21 October 2017 – 22 October 2017 Illinois, USA
  • New York QSO Party 21 October 2017 – 22 October 2017 New York, USA
  • ARRL Sweepstakes (Phone) 18 November 2017 – 19 November 2017

The Cars That Made America – It’s Been Awhile, but Finally a Good Documentary from the History Channel

I haven’t been very kind to the History Channel in recent years. They shifted from showing History documentaries to showing reality programming, some which isn’t remotely History related, and programs that feature thinly supported conjecture, conspiracy theory, and poor method. Good examples of this are Hunting Hitler and Amelia Earhart: The Lost Evidence. I understand that they need to balance information with entertainment, but their recent efforts have forgone accuracy, objectivity, and method for sensation to drive ratings. Happily, their most recent documentary series, The Cars That Made America, did not fall into that trap.

The series title is “The Cars That Made America,” but it isn’t about the cars, it’s about the automotive industry in the United States and the men that drove the industry. Instead of focusing on the cars, the series instead focused on major figures in the industry, such as the heads of Ford, General Motors, and Chrysler. It could have included more figures and more companies, but I think that concentrating on the big three made it tighter and easier to follow. It showed how they drove the industry, how the industry changed the country, and how changing times, in turn, influenced the industry. I thought it did a good job of fleshing out the personalities of the company heads without turning it into hero worship or hagiography. Henry Ford, arguably the most intriguing of the figures, is a good example; it showed both the good he did for automobile and his company but also showed how he harmed his company and the poor relationship he had with his son, Edsel. Likewise, it didn’t paper over how he used Harry Bennett as an enforcer.

Production wise, it’s much like their The Men Who Built America series in that it combines re-enactment with interviews of historians and experts in the field. With this series, however, they also utilized interviews with NASCAR drivers (although with some of them it seemed more like they were reading from a script rather than giving their own thoughts) and Mario Andretti. I have to admit that I was skeptical at first of using the NASCAR drivers, but I quickly realized that they were being used as hooks; they’re familiar personalities who could pull viewers to the program. The producers used them to make bullet points – to present major points or themes which were in turn elaborated on and fleshed out by historians and industry experts. I think it was a pretty good idea that probably resulted in more people paying attention to the historians and experts than they would otherwise.

Overall, I think it was their best documentary in recent years. It struck a good balance between being entertaining and being informative and did a good job in showing how the automobile and the automotive industry changed United States history while itself being shaped by historical events and trends. This isn’t something I’ve been able to say in recent years, but… Well done, History Channel!

Battle of Passchendaele/Tyne Cot Cemetery Special Event QSL Card

Last year I was proud to log the Belgian Amateur Radio Station ON4PTC, which was remembering the World War I Battle of Passchendaele, which had it’s 100th Anniversary this year. The callsign suffix PTC stands for Passchendaele and the Tyne Cot cemetery, where almost 12,000 British Commonwealth (and 1 French) dead from the battle are buried. Appropriately enough, I logged them on the weekend following the day World War I ended (11 November 1918) – Armistice Day, now Veterans Day (the battle also ended on 10 November 1917). Passchendaele, also known as the Third Battle of Ypres, last for just over three months was a horrific battle remembered for its muddy conditions and the number of casualties it created – somewhere between (depending on estimates) 400,000 and 850,000.

Front of the ON4PTC 2016 QSL card

Back of the ON4PTC 2016 QSL card

World War I lasted from 28 July 1914 to 11 November 2018; centenary commemorations like this will continue through next year. It’s a good way for amateur radio operators to help commemorate the war, remember its fallen, and try to prevent the reoccurrence of such a conflagration.

Review: The Wilderness Warrior: Theodore Roosevelt and the Crusade for America, 1858-1919

The Wilderness Warrior: Theodore Roosevelt and the Crusade for America, 1858-1919 is a biography of Theodore Roosevelt that concentrates strictly on his conservationist side. Other domestic policy and foreign policy occasionally come into play, but only when it’s connected to conservation policy. It is a long book, repetitive on occasion, but very readable and engaging.

 

“We regard Attic temples and Roman triumphal arches and Gothic cathedrals as of priceless value,” Roosevelt decreed, full of wilderness warrior fury. “But we are, as a whole, still in that low state of civilization where we do not understand that it is also vandalism wantonly to destroy or to permit the destruction of what is beautiful in nature, whether it be a cliff, a forest, or a species of mammal or bird. Here in the United States we turn our rivers and streams into sewers and dumping-grounds, we pollute the air, we destroy forests, and exterminate fishes, birds, and mammals—not to speak of vulgarizing charming landscapes with hideous advertisements.”

 

From childhood to adult, Brinkley covers what made Roosevelt a conservationist and sets the stage for what he was to do as a public servant and politician; you really get an idea of what made Roosevelt the unique personality he was. He then explains in detail not only what Roosevelt did but how and why; you couldn’t get a much better explanation of his conservation policy. Brinkley ties in the personalities from all walks of life who helped shape and execute his policies as well. Unfortunately, the book seems to end abruptly; Brinkley writes about Roosevelts plans post-Presidency but doesn’t go into them in the same detail that he did everything else. Don’t think, however, that this book is a hagiography. Brinkley takes care to point out the contrast between Roosevelt’s conservationism and some, but not all, of his hunting and between his conservationist policy and reclamation policy. Granted, this would have made an already long book even longer, perhaps a second volume would have been in order. The book is well researched and documented, with good maps, annexes, and end notes; the maps, however, would have served better in-line with the relevant text. They very well may have been in the print edition, but I was reading the Kindle version and the maps came after the final chapter.

 

“As forces of globalization run amok, Roosevelt’s stout resoluteness to protect our environment is a strong reminder of our national wilderness heritage, as well as an increasingly urgent call to arms.”

 

Published in 2009, The Wilderness Warrior is somewhat prescient given the environmental policies of the current administration. Many times as I was reading I found myself asking what Roosevelt would think of President Trump. In the area of environmental policy, there’s no doubt that Roosevelt would find our current policies and administration wanting.

I thoroughly enjoyed reading The Wilderness Warrior and learned quite a bit from it. If you’re interested in nature and wildlife conservation and the origins of the forest service, our national parks and monuments, and our wildlife refuges, this book is a great place to start. If you’re at all interested in what made our 26th President tick, this is a good book to read.

Mobile HF in Savannah; 6 August 2017

Savannah – I’m at home in Savannah for a few days and Sunday ended up being laundry day. The plan of the day was to enjoy the day’s IMSA racing live for a change instead of catching up via YouTube or the DVR a few days later, but I had some time between finishing laundry and the races starting… what was I to do? I found a nice shady spot at a local park and fired up the mobile station. All I heard on 40 Meters (& MHz) were nets and 20 Meters (14 MHz) had terrible QSB (fading), but I found two lighthouse stations and a museum ship station to put in the log. I may not have logged a bunch of stations, but I had three good QSOs that combined my love of Amateur Radio and History.

I love logging historic ships like the USS Olympia and today was the second time I’ve had the honor of logging her. She’s truly a historic ship  – she was Dewey’s flagship at the Battle of Manila Bay and afterward served in the Caribbean, Atlantic, and the Mediterranean. She served as a training ship at the Naval Academy and as a barracks ship in Charleston, SC before being recommissioned for service in World War I. She is now the oldest steel USN warship afloat and is the only remaining USN vessel from the Spanish American War. The Independence Seaport Museum is now conducting fundraising to dry dock and repair her hull; I hope they succeed because she deserves to be saved and continue serving as a reminder of one of the forgotten periods of our history.

 

 

Coastal Georgia Military Monitoring Recap; July 2017

I didn’t have as many monitoring opportunities during July as I did in June, but it still turned out to be a pretty good month. The second half of the month saw another Sentry Savannah exercise at the Savannah Air Dominance Center with F-22s, T-38s, and F/A-18s based at Savannah IAP and a KC-135 based at Hunter AAF. VMFT-401 F-5Ns made another visit to MCAS Beaufort to help VMFAT-501 train new F-35B pilots. The 224th MI Battalion at Hunter AAF saw the addition of a new aircraft and Coast Guard Air Station Savannah, also at Hunter AAF, swapped out two of their MH-65s.

 

Hunter AAF
124.975 – Tower
279.575 – Tower
121.800 – Ground
291.675 – Ground
126.200 – Base Ops
285.425 – Base Ops
309.000 – PMSV
37.975 – 2-3 AVN “KNIGHTHAWK Ops”
40.875 – C/2-3 AVN Air-to-Air
34.125 – 3-17 CAV “LIGHTHORSE Ops”
345.000 – USCG AirSta Savannah Ops

ARMY 26841 (UH-60L, 99-26841, A/2-3 AVN)
ARMY 27055 (UH-60L, 05-27055, A/2-3 AVN)
ARMY 08445 (CH-47F, 14-08445, B/2-3 AVN)
ARMY 20609 (HH-60M, 13-20609, C/2-3 AVN)
ARMY 20615 (HH-60M, 13-20615, C/2-3 AVN)
ARMY 20616 (HH-60M, 13-20616, C/2-3 AVN)
ARMY 20680 (HH-60M, 14-20680, C/2-3 AVN)
ARMY 20685 (HH-60M, 14-20685, C/2-3 AVN)
ARMY 45436 (AH-64D, 04-05436, 3-17 CAV)
ARMY 75518 (AH-64D, 07-05518, 3-17 CAV)
ARMY 77043 (AH-64D, 07-07043, 3-17 CAV)
ARMY 77045 (AH-64D, 07-07045, 3-17 CAV)
ARMY 77046 (AH-64D, 07-07046, 3-17 CAV)
ARMY 87048 (AH-64D, 08-07048, 3-17 CAV)
ARMY 95591 (AH-64D, 09-05591, 3-17 CAV)
ARMY 95592 (AH-64D, 09-05592, 3-17 CAV)
ARMY 95594 (AH-64D, 09-05594, 3-17 CAV)
ARMY 95596 (AH-64D, 09-05596, 3-17 CAV)
ARMY 95602 (AH-64D, 09-05602, 3-17 CAV)
ARMY 95605 (AH-64D, 09-05605, 3-17 CAV)
ARMY 20586 (UH-60M, 13-20586, 4-3 AVN)
ARMY 20592 (UH-60M, 12-20592, 4-3 AVN)
ARMY 20637 (UH-60M, 13-20637, 4-3 AVN)
ARMY 20651 (UH-60M, 14-20651, 4-3 AVN)
ARMY 20652 (UH-60M, 14-20652, 4-3 AVN)
ARMY 03748 (MH-47G, 04-03748, 3-160 SOAR)
ARMY 03752 (MH-47G, 04-03752, 3-160 SOAR)
ARMY 20015 (MH-60M, 05-20015, 3-160 SOAR)
ARMY 20019 (MH-60M, 05-20019, 3-160 SOAR)
ARMY 20022 (MH-60M, 05-20022, 3-160 SOAR)
SHADY 33 (MC-12S-2, 10-00742, B/224 MI Bn)
SHADY 60 (MC-12S-2, 09-00642, 224th MI Bn)
SHADY 80 (MC-12S-2, 09-00642, 224th MI Bn)
SHADY 80 (MC-12S-2, 10-00739, 224th MI Bn)
GUARD 08761 (CH-47F, 08-08761, 1/169 AVN)
COAST GUARD 6516 (MH-65D, 6516, CGAS Savannah)
COAST GUARD 6531 (MH-65D, 6531, CGAS Savannah)
COAST GUARD 6544 (MH-65D, 6544, CGAS Savannah)
COAST GUARD 6550 (MH-65D, 6550, CGAS Savannah)
COAST GUARD 6562 (MH-65D, 6562, CGAS Savannah)
COAST GUARD 6567 (MH-65D, 6567, CGAS Savannah)
ARMY 95687 (AH-64D)
ARTIC 61 (KC-135R, 63-8043, 168th ARW)

 

Savannah IAP/CRTC
119.100 – Tower
257.800 – Tower
121.900 – Ground
348.600 – Ground
120.400 – Approach/Departure
353.775 – Approach/Departure
125.300 – Approach/Departure
371.875 – Approach/Departure
118.400 – Approach/Departure
307.225 – Approach/Departure
123.025 – Savannah Helicopter Advisory
225.750 – 165th AW CP “ANIMAL CONTROL”
173.5625 – 165th AW MOC (NAC 302)
237.000 – CRTC Ops; 43rd FS “HORNET Ops”
255.675 – 43rd FS Air-to-Air
256.750 – 43rd FS Air-to-Air
288.900 – 43rd FS Air-to-Air
290.675 – 43rd FS Air-to-Air
352.100 – 43rd FS Air-to-Air
320.600 – 2nd FTS Air-to-Air
350.675 – North TACTS Range; VFA-83 Base
253.200 – CRTC; VFA-83 Air-to-Air
358.150 – CRTC; VFA-83 Air-to-Air
123.200 – WCM9, Gulfstream Aerospace
128.925 – Gulfstream Service Center
130.375 – Signature Flight Support

DAWG 08 (C-130H3, 94-6708, 165th AW)
DAWG 65 (C-130H, 165th AW)
DAWG 75 (C-130H3, 94-6706, 165th AW)
GULFTEST 06 (G500, N502GS, Gulfstream Aerospace)
GULFTEST 14 (G450, N351TP, Wilmington Trust Co)
GULFTEST 25 (G500, N504GS, Gulfstream Aerospace)
GULFTEST 30 (G600, N720GD, Gulfstream Aerospace)
GULFTEST 52 (G500, N500GA, Gulfstream Aerospace)
GULFTEST 58 (G500, N503G, Gulfstream Aerospace)
GULFTEST 83 (G600, N720GD, Gulfstream Aerospace)
GULFTEST 89 (G500, N504GS, Gulfstream Aerospace)
ATLAS (F-22A, 43rd FS)
RAPTOR (F-22A, 43rd FS)
SAVAGE (F-22A, 43rd FS)
STINGER (F-22A, 43rd FS)
TALON (T-38, 2nd FTS)
BEAGLE (T-38, 2nd FTS)
HOUND (T-38, 2nd FTS)
RAM (F/A-18C, VFA-83)

 

Sentry Savannah
288.400 – NORAD Discrete; Check-In
293.600 – NORAD Discrete; Blue Air
316.300 – NORAD Discrete; Red Air
265.400 – NORAD Discrete; Aerial Refueling

 

Fort Stewart/Wright AAF
127.350 – Marne Radio
279.625 – Marne Radio
126.250 – Wright AAF Tower
269.275 – Wright AAF Tower
48.500 – Fort Stewart Range Control

 

Brunswick/Golden Isles Airport
123.000 – CTAF

 

Malcolm McKinnon Airport/Jekyll Island Airport
123.050 – CTAF

 

Plantation Air Park, Sylvania, GA
122.800 – CTAF

 

Statesboro-Bulloch County Airport
122.800 – CTAF

JUMPER 2 (C182, The Jumping Place)

 

MCAS Beaufort
119.050 – Tower
342.875 – Tower
269.125 – Approach/Departure
123.700 – Approach/Departure
292.125 – Approach/Departure
125.125 – Approach/Departure
281.800 – Base Ops
264.500 – PMSV
339.500 – VMFA-115 Tac 1
253.100 – VMFA-122 Base
299.300 – VMFA(AW)-533 Tac 2
348.825 – VMFA(AW)-533 Tac 3
343.200 – VMFAT-501 Base
326.700 – VMFAT-501 Tac 1
349.225 – VMFAT-501 Tac 2
250.300 – VMFT-401 Air-to-Air
268.300 – VMFT-401 Air-to-Air

BLADE 2# (F/A-18C, VMFA-115)
NIKEL 3# (F/A-18C, VMFA-122)
HECK 6# (F/A-18C, VMFA-312)
HAWK 8# (F/A-18D, VMFA-533)
CONVICT 8# (F/A-18D, VMFA-533)
SWEDE ## (F-35B, VMFAT-501)
SNIPER ## (F-5N, VMFT-401)
FOX 840 (UC-12M, 163840, MCAS Beaufort)

 

Hilton Head Airport
118.975 – Tower

 

Jacksonville IAP
118.000 – Approach/Departure
121.300 – Approach/Departure
123.800 – Approach/Departure
124.900 – Approach/Departure
127.000 – Approach/Departure
322.400 – Approach/Departure
335.600 – Approach/Departure
351.800 – Approach/Departure
377.050 – Approach/Departure

FANG (F-15C, 125th FW)

 

NAS Jacksonville/Mayport NS/Cecil Field
118.000 – Approach/Departure
121.300 – Approach/Departure
123.800 – Approach/Departure
124.900 – Approach/Departure
127.000 – Approach/Departure
322.400 – Approach/Departure
335.600 – Approach/Departure
351.800 – Approach/Departure
377.050 – Approach/Departure
310.200 – NAS Jacksonville Base Ops

VENOM 507 (MH-60R, 168136, HSM-48)
NAVY AC 707 flight (MH-60R, 168113, HSM-74)
MADFOX 00 (P-8A, 168432, VP-5)
MADFOX 09 (P-8A, 169003, VP-5)
MADFOX 42 (P-8A, 169003, VP-5)
MADFOX 55 (P-8A, 168436, VP-5)
MADFOX 77 (P-8A, 168432, VP-5)
MADFOX 77 (P-8A, 168436, VP-5)
LANCER 07 (P-8A, 168764, VP-10)
GRIFIN 01 (P-8A, 168439, VP-10)
TIGER 07 (P-8A, 168434, VP-8)
TIGER 08 (P-8A, 169007, VP-8)
TIGER 17 (P-8A, 168999, VP-5)
TIGER 21 (P-8A, 169007, VP-8)
TIGER 24 (P-8A, 168436, VP-8)
LANCER 06 (P-8A, 168433, VP-10)
LANCER 07 (P-8A, 168439, VP-10)
LANCER 50 (P-8A, 168764, VP-10)
NAVY LL 801 (P-8A, 169002, VP-30)
NAVY LL 803 (P-8A, 168439, VP-30)
NAVY LL 808 (P-8A, 169002, VP-30)
NAVY LL 808 (P-8A, 169010, VP-30)
NAVY LL 811 (P-8A, 169006, VP-30)
NAVY LL 818 (P-8A, 168997, VP-30)
NAVY LL 822 (P-8A, 169004, VP-30)
NAVY LL 844 (P-8A, 169002, VP-30)
NAVY LL 846 (P-8A, 169002, VP-30)
NAVY LL 860 (P-8A, 169010, VP-30)
NAVY LL 887 (P-8A, 169004, VP-30)
NAVY LL 888 (P-8A, 169004, VP-30)
NAVY LL 899 (P-8A, 169000, VP-30)
PELICAN 02 (P-8A, 168858, VP-45)
PELICAN 06 (P-8A, 168434, VP-45)
PELICAN 06 (P-8A, 168858, VP-45)
PELICAN 07 (P-8A, 168761, VP-45)
PELICAN 18 (P-8A, 168761, VP-45)
PELICAN 25 (P-8A, 168761, VP-45)
PELICAN 56 (P-8A, 168999, VP-45)
PELICAN 77 (P-8A, 168999, VP-30)
NAVY LT 622 (P-3C, VP-62)
CONVOY 3961 (C-130T, 165438, VR-62)

 

Charleston AFB
120.700 – Charleston App/Dep
135.800 – Charleston App/Dep
306.925 – Charleston App/Dep
379.925 – Charleston App/Dep
134.100 – Charleston AFB “PALMETTO Ops”
349.400 – Charleston AFB “PALMETTO Ops”

LIFTER 37 (C-17A, 437th/315th AW)
PRIME 35 (C-17A, 97-0046, 437t/315th AW)

 

Shaw AFB
125.400 – Columbia App/Dep
318.100 – Columbia App/Dep

GUNDOG ## (F-16CM, 79th FS)

 

McEntire ANGB
125.400 – Columbia App/Dep
318.100 – Columbia App/Dep
298.300 – 169th FW “SWAMP FOX Ops”
141.825 – 169th FW V14
140.125 – 169th FW V15
225.700 – 169th FW Air-to-Air

MACE ## (F-16CM, 169th FW)
VIPER ## (F-16CM. 169th FW)
TABOR 2# (F-16C, 169th FW)

 

Ranges/Military Operating Areas
228.400 – Townsend Range/Coastal MOA
269.350 – Coastal MOA
343.750 – Bulldog MOA

 

SEALORD (USN FACSFAC Jax)
120.950 – North Primary
133.950 – South Primary
284.500 – North Primary
267.500 – South Primary
313.700 – North Secondary
349.800 – W-137 Discrete
376.900 – W-137 Discrete

 

Miscellaneous
293.600 – NORAD Discrete
316.300 – NORAD Discrete

ARMY 90102 (UC-35B, 99-00102, 1-214 AVN)
ARMY 90103 (UC-35B, 99-00103, B/2-228 AVN)
ARMY 90104 (UC-35B, 99-00104, A/2-228 AVN)
CONVOY 3943 (C-130T, 165351, VR-53)
CONVOY 4302 (C-40A, 165830, VR-59)
FIRST 71 (F-22A, 1st FW)
GUARD 72094 (UH-72A, 09-72094, 2-151 AVN SC ARNG)
KEYS 81 (KC-135R, 58-0079, 186th ARW)
NOAA 46 (DHC-6-300, N46RF, NOAA)
PAT 121 (C-12V, 94-00325, WA ARNG)
PAT 727 (C-26B, 91-00504, US Army)
REACH 071 (KC-135R, 58-0102, 507th ARW)
REACH 140 (C-130J, 14-5791, 19th AW)
REACH 885 (C-17A, 90-0532, 62nd AW)
REACH 926 (C-17A, 00-0175, 305th AMW)
REACH 927 (C-17A, 10-0217, 62nd AW)
REACH 983 (C-130J, 07-4638, 19th AW)
RIPTIDE 24 (LJ35, N524PA, Phoenix Air Group)
SPUR 56 (KC-135R, 63-7993, 121st ARW)
SPUR 57 (KC-135R, 62-3528, 916th ARW)
LIFESTAR 1 (Bell 407, N406UH, Air Methods)
N269AE (Bell 206L-3, AirEvac 91 Vidalia)
N296AE (Bell 206L-1, AirEvac 95 Statesboro)

 

ARTCC
256.900/133.700 – Jax Center Baxley Low
269.550/124.700 – Jax Center Columbia Low
277.400/126.750 – Jax Center Brunswick Low
281.550 – Jax Center Georgetown High
282.200/124.675 – Jax Center Jekyll Low
282.300/135.975 – Jax Center Alma High
285.650/126.125 – Jax Center Statesboro High
290.350/132.425 – Jax Center Hunter Ultra High
290.400/132.300 – Jax Center Waycross Low
307.250/126.350 – Jax Center St. Augustine High
319.200/127.875 – Jax Center Aiken High
351.700/124.075 – Jax Center Summerville High
363.200/132.925 – Jax Center Millen Low
379.100/127.950 – Jax Center Charleston Low
135.050 – Jax Center Meta Low/High

273.600/123.950 – Atlanta Center Macon Low
290.375/125.825 – Atlanta Center Macon Ultra High
307.050/126.425 – Atlanta Center Dublin High
322.325/128.100 – Atlanta Center Augusta Low

255.400/123.650 – FSS

 

USCG
156.8000 – Marine VHF Ch. 16
157.0500 – Marine VHF Ch. 21; Sector Charleston/Station Tybee
157.1000 – Marine VHF Ch. 22
162.3250 – USCG Net 111 (NAC 293); Sector Jacksonville
163.1375 – USCG Net 113 (NAC 293); Station Tybee
164.9000 – USCG Net 118 (NAC 293); Station Brunswick
412.9750 – USCG Net 409 (NAC 293); Sector Jacksonville
413.0000 – USCG Net 410 (NAC 293); Sector Charleston

 

 

 

Coastal Georgia Mode-S Log; July 2017

Mode-S hits from Military, Government, and Public Safety related aircraft as well as various other aircraft that catch my attention from attended monitoring of my RadarBox in Savannah and RadarBox Micro in Brunswick, GA.

 

A2A071 – Bell 206L-3, N269AE, AirEvac 91 Vidalia (N269AE)
A30BC9 – Bell 206L-1, N296AE, AirEvac 95 Statesboro (N296AE)
A3EA3B – G450, N351TP, Wilmington Trust Co (GLF14)
A4C4B5 – Bell 407, N406UH, Air Methods (N406UH on box, LIFESTAR 1 on ATC)
A598BF – DHC-6-300, N46RF, NOAA (NOAA46)
A63A87 – G500, N500GA, Gulfstream Aerospace (GLF52)
A64205 – G500, N502GS, Gulfstream Aerospace (GLF6)
A645AB – G500, N503G, Gulfstream Aerospace (GLF51)
A645AB – G500, N503G, Gulfstream Aerospace (GLF58)
A64973 – G500, N504GS, Gulfstream Aerospace (GLF25)
A64973 – G500, N504GS, Gulfstream Aerospace (GLF89)
A69910 – LJ35, N524PA, Phoenix Air Group (RIPTIDE 24 on ATC)
A88D54 – G6550, N650GD, Gulfstream
A9A426 – G600, N720GD, Gulfstream Aerospace (GLF30)
A9A426 – G600, N720GD, Gulfstream Aerospace (GLF83)
ADFD74 – C-26B, 91-00504, US Army (PAT 727 on ATC)
ADFDEB – C-130H3, 94-6706, 165th AW (DAWG 75 on ATC)
ADFDED – C-130H3, 94-6708, 165th AW (RCH101 on box, DAWG 08 on ATC)
ADFE54 – C-12V, 94-00325, WA ARNG (PAT121)
ADFE55 – C-12V, 94-00326, US Army OSACOM (PAT326)
AE010D – C-37A, 97-0400, 89th AW
AE0130 – KC-10A, 87-0118, 305th AMW (SPUR55)
AE0214 – KC-10A, 83-0076, 60th AMW (RCH051)
AE02C7 – C-130H, 89-9103, 910 AW (VADER03)
AE0365 – KC-135R, 61-0314, 6th AMW (BOLT13)
AE037A – KC-135R, 63-7993, 121st ARW (SPUR56)
AE0383 – KC-135R, 58-0079, 186th ARW (KEYS81)
AE03EC – C-130T, 165438, VR-62 (CONVOY 3961 on ATC)
AE03EF – C-130T, 165351, VR-62? (3961 ref to 3943 as sister ship) (CONVOY 3943 on ATC)
AE0484 – KC-135R, 62-3509, 916th ARW (BACKY95)
AE0499 – KC-135R, 58-0010, 108th AW (SPUR52)
AE04A6 – KC-135R, 63-8033, 6th AMW (PIRAT04)
AE04D7 – C-40A, 165829, VR-58 (CNV4875)
AE04D8 – C-40A, 165830, VR-59 (CNV4302)
AE04DA – C-40A, 165832, VR-58 (CNV4361)
AE05AD – KC-135R, 63-8043, 168th ARW (ARTIC61)
AE0656 – KC-135R, 58-0102, 507th ARW (RCH071)
AE065D – KC-135R, 60-0320, 6th AMW (BOLT11)
AE067A – EC-130J, 00-1934, 193rd SOW (BATON61)
AE06D9 – UC-12F, 163561, USMC
AE06E4 – UC-12M, 163836, MCAS Beaufort
AE074E – UC-12M, 163840, MCAS Beaufort
AE074E – UC-12M, 163840, MCAS Beaufort (FOX 840 on ATC)
AE07B7 – KC-135R, 62-3528, 916th ARW (SPUR57)
AE07F8 – C-17A, 97-0046, 437th/315th AW
AE0811 – C-17A, 00-0175, 305th AMW (RCH926)
AE087E – C-37A, 01-0028, 6th AMW
AE093D – UC-35A, 01-0301, OSACOM PATD
AE093D – UC-35A, 01-0301, OSACOM PATD R1O301 (3rd character was O, no 0)
AE0945 – C-40B, 01-0040, 89th AW (SAM789)
AE10E8 – HC-130J, 2002, CGAS Elizabeth City (C2002)
AE1165 – C-40C, 02-0201, 113th Wing (BOXER 45)
AE123E – C-17A, 04-4133, 305th AMW
AE1D41 – P-3C, 161121, VP-30?
AE1F6D – UH-72A, 09-72094, 2-151 AVN SC ARNG
AE266A – MH-65D, 6516, CGAS Savannah (C6516)
AE2679 – MH-65D, 6531, USCG (C6531)
AE2688 – MH-65D, 6550, CGAS Savannah (6550)
AE2694 – MH-65D, 6562, CGAS Savannah (C6562)
AE2699 – MH-65D, 6567, CGAS Savannah (C6567)
AE2F61 – MC-12S-2, 09-00642, 224th MI Bn (SHADY60)
AE2F61 – MC-12S-2, 09-00642, 224th MI Bn (SHADY80)
AE2F61 – MC-12S-2, 09-00642, 224th MI Bn (SHADY23)
AE2F61 – MC-12S-2, 09-00642, 224th MI Bn (SHADY60)
AE2F61 – MC-12S-2, 09-00642, 224th MI Bn (SHADY80)
AE2FAA – C-17A, 08-8198, 437th/315th AW
AE4C61 – MC-12S-2, 10-00739, 224th MI Bn (SHADY 80 on ATC)
AE4C62 – MC-12S-2, 10-00742, B/224 MI Bn (SHADY33)
AE4C62 – MC-12S-2, 10-00742, B/224 MI Bn (SHADY85)
AE4D6A – C-17A, 10-0217, 62nd AW (RCH927)
AE4E09 – C-130J, 08-5715, 317th AG (RCHA612)
AE4EB6 – P-8A, 168432, VP-5 (00000000 on box, MADFOX 00 on ATC)
AE4EB6 – P-8A, 168432, VP-5 (MADFX77)
AE4EB7 – P-8A, 168433, VP-10 (LANCR06)
AE4EB8 – P-8A, 168434, VP-45 (PELCN06)
AE4EB8 – P-8A, 168434, VP-8 (TIGER7)
AE4EBA – P-8A, 168436, VP-5 (MADFX55)
AE4EBA – P-8A, 168436, VP-5 (MADFX77)
AE4EBA – P-8A, 168436, VP-8 (TIGER24)
AE4EBC – P-8A, 168438, VP-5
AE4EBD – P-8A, 168439, VP-10 (GRIFIN1)
AE4EBD – P-8A, 168439, VP-10 (LANCR07)
AE4EBD – P-8A, 168439, VP-30 (VVLL803)
AE4EC6 – P-8A, 168761, VP-45 (PELCN07)
AE4EC6 – P-8A, 168761, VP-45 (PELCN18)
AE4EC6 – P-8A, 168761, VP-45 (PELCN24)
AE4EC6 – P-8A, 168761, VP-45 (PELCN25)
AE4EC9 – P-8A, 168764, VP-10 (LANCR07)
AE4EC9 – P-8A, 168764, VP-10 (LANCR50)
AE509F – MH-65D, 6544, CGAS Savannah (C6544)
AE509F – MH-65D, 6544, CGAS Savannah (CGNR6544)
AE56B8 – UH-60M, 12-20592, 4-3 AVN
AE56CB – HH-60M, 13-20611, C/2-3 AVN (2611)
AE570F – C-12V, 10-00258, unknown
AE5718 – C-40A, 168980, VR-61 (CNV4182)
AE5773 – C-12V, 10-00257, US Army
AE57BC – P-8A, 168856, VP-30 (00000000)
AE57BE – P-8A, 168858, VP-45 (PELCN02)
AE57BE – P-8A, 168858, VP-45 (PELCN06)
AE57BE – P-8A, 168858, VP-45 (PELCN88)
AE57C2 – P-8A, 168997, VP-30 (00000000)
AE57C2 – P-8A, 168997, VP-30 (VVLL818)
AE57C4 – P-8A, 168999, VP-45 (00000000)
AE57C4 – P-8A, 168999, VP-45 (PELCN56)
AE57C4 – P-8A, 168999, VP-45 (PELCN77)
AE57C4 – P-8A, 168999, VP-5 (TIGER17)
AE57C5 – P-8A, 169000, VP-30 (VVLL899)
AE57C7 – P-8A, 169002, VP-30 (00000000)
AE57C7 – P-8A, 169002, VP-30 (VVLL801)
AE57C7 – P-8A, 169002, VP-30 (VVLL808)
AE57C7 – P-8A, 169002, VP-30 (VVLL844)
AE57C7 – P-8A, 169002, VP-30 (VVLL846)
AE57C8 – P-8A, 169003, VP-5 (MADFX09)
AE57C8 – P-8A, 169003, VP-5 (MADFX42)
AE57C8 – P-8A, 169003, VP-5 (MADFX55)
AE57C9 – P-8A, 169004, VP-30 (VVLL822)
AE57C9 – P-8A, 169004, VP-30 (VVLL887)
AE57C9 – P-8A, 169004, VP-30 (VVLL888)
AE57CB – P-8A, 169006, VP-30 (VVLL811)
AE57CC – P-8A, 169007, VP-8 (00000000)
AE57CC – P-8A, 169007, VP-8 (TIGER21)
AE57CC – P-8A, 169007, VP-8 (TIGER8)
AE57CF – P-8A, 169010, VP-30 (VVLL808)
AE57CF – P-8A, 169010, VP-30 (VVLL860)
AE57D0 – P-8A, 169011, VP-5 (00000000)
AE595D – C-130J, 14-5791, 19th AW (RCH140)
AE596B – AC-130J, 14-5797, 1st SOG (GHOST91)
AE5C59 – P-8A, 169327, VP-30 (VVLL821)

 

 

Changes at Coast Guard Air Station Savannah

Savannah – As I wrote last week, Coast Guard Air Station Savannah swapped out some aircraft. At the time, I wasn’t sure of exactly which aircraft were swapped, but another week of monitoring has confirmed which ones are now based at the Air Station.

CGAS Savannah Aircraft
MH-65D, 6516 (AE266A)
MH-65D, 6531 (AE2679)
MH-65D, 6544 (AE509F)
MH-65D, 6550 (AE2688)
MH-65D, 6567 (AE2699)

6516 and 6550 have been at Air Station Savannah for awhile. 6544 is a more recent addition and also happens to have the white heritage paint scheme for 100 years of Coast Guard aviation. 6531 and 6567 are the two aircraft that just arrived this month.

While I’m on the subject of Air Station Savannah, I thought I’d mention that they’ve also recently changed how the helicopters are communicating with the Air Station. Since shortly after the Sector Charleston area began using the Rescue 21 radio system, Air Station Savannah began using CG 107 (150.300, P25 digital voice) as their Ops frequency. I’m not sure why, but over the last couple of months, they’ve gone back to using 345.000 (AM) as their Ops frequency.

 

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Urban sunrise. Who said you can't have a beautiful #sunrise in the city? #Brunswick #Georgia ADS-B plot on NOAA 49 (N49RF, G-IV, NOAA), also known as GONZO, departing out of Savannah IAP earlier this afternoon on a mission to #HurricaneMaria on 124.675 to 126.125 with Jax Center. Not sending ADS-B but also heard this afternoon was TEAL 72 (WC-130J, 99-5309, 53rd WRS) going out to #HurricaneJose on 132.925. #AvGeek #Weather #Aviaion #HurricaneHunter Getting the day started with some diner food. I love Sunny Side Up's hashbrowns deluxe with chicken, grilled broccoli, grilled onions, and mushrooms. #Savannah #diner #SunnySideUp #breakfast Greeted by a toad when I walked outside this morning. #wildlife #urbanwildlife #nature

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