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The National Civil War Naval Museum in Columbus, GA

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Columbus – On the second day of my two day visit to Columbus, I visited the National Civil War Naval Museum along the Muscogee River. The museum isn’t nearly as big as the National Infantry Museum I visited the previous day, but it is packed with fascinating artifacts, weapons, gear, memorabilia, and models that tell the story of both the Union and Confederate navies during the Civil War. It has two unique displays: the remains of the ironclad CSS Jackson and the gunboat CSS Chattahoochee. Additionally, it has mock-ups of the ironclad CSS Albemarle, ironclad USS Monitor, and the steam-powered sloop-of-war USS Hartford, which served as Admiral David G. Farragut’s flagship. They also feature a very impressive collection of Civil War flags from ships and forts involved in naval engagements. Outside of the museum is a recreation of the USS/CSS Water Witch, a steam-powered sidewheel gunboat that served with both the US and Confederate navies during the Civil War.

Model of the Confederate States torpedo boat David

Model of the Confederate States torpedo boat David

Model of the CSS Atlanta

Model of the CSS Atlanta

Model of the Confedrate blockade runner Mary Bowers

Model of the Confedrate blockade runner Mary Bowers

Models of the CSS Virginia and USS Monitor

Models of the CSS Virginia and USS Monitor

Various US and Confederate flags in the museums flag collection

Various US and Confederate flags in the museums flag collection

Various US and Confederate flags in the museums flag collection

Various US and Confederate flags in the museums flag collection

Various US and Confederate flags in the museums flag collection

Various US and Confederate flags in the museums flag collection

The USS Water Witch features prominently at the museum. She began the war in US Navy service, but was captured by Confederate Marines in Ossabaw Sound off of Savannah on 3 June 1864. After her capture, she served with the Confederate Navy as the CSS Water Witch. She remained in the area until 19 December 1864 when she was burned to prevent recapture by approaching Union forces. A recreation of the Water Witch (which is currently closed to tours) is outside the museum and a model of the ship is located in the museum lobby. A Bible from the ship is also displayed with the model. The Water Witch also has a connection with the CSS Jackson, another of the other ships featured in the museum; her Confederate Navy Captain, Lt. W.W. Carnes, was ordered to Columbus to take command of the Jackson.

Recreation of the USS/CSS Water Witch outside of the National Civil War Naval Museum

Recreation of the USS/CSS Water Witch outside of the National Civil War Naval Museum

Model of the USS/CSS Water Witch inside of the museum

Model of the USS/CSS Water Witch inside of the museum

Bible from the USS Water Witch on display along with the model

Bible from the USS Water Witch on display along with the model

Originally built and launched as the CSS Muscogee, the CSS Jackson was an ironclad ram launched late in the war on 22 December 1864. She was built in Columbus with machinery built by the Columbus Naval Iron Works. Delays prevented her from being fitted out and seeing action; she was ultimately burned and sunk during the Battle of Columbus on 16 April 1865. Raised almost a century later, her archaeological remains are now on display at the National Civil War Naval Museum. It was incredible to stand before the ship’s remnants and get an idea of the size and construction of a Civil War ironclad. In the photos below, the white structure above the remains of the hull show what the topside of the Jackson would have looked like.

The remains of the wooden hull of the CSS Jackson, raised from bottom of the Muscogee River 100 years after she was burned and sunk

The remains of the wooden hull of the CSS Jackson, raised from bottom of the Muscogee River 100 years after she was burned and sunk

The remains of the wooden hull of the CSS Jackson, raised from bottom of the Muscogee River 100 years after she was burned and sunk

The remains of the wooden hull of the CSS Jackson, raised from bottom of the Muscogee River 100 years after she was burned and sunk

The remains of the wooden hull of the CSS Jackson, raised from bottom of the Muscogee River 100 years after she was burned and sunk

The remains of the wooden hull of the CSS Jackson, raised from bottom of the Muscogee River 100 years after she was burned and sunk

The remains of the wooden hull of the CSS Jackson, raised from bottom of the Muscogee River 100 years after she was burned and sunk

The remains of the wooden hull of the CSS Jackson, raised from bottom of the Muscogee River 100 years after she was burned and sunk

The remains of the wooden hull of the CSS Jackson, raised from bottom of the Muscogee River 100 years after she was burned and sunk

The remains of the wooden hull of the CSS Jackson, raised from bottom of the Muscogee River 100 years after she was burned and sunk

Cross section of the CSS Jackson's composite armor: 4

Cross section of the CSS Jackson’s composite armor: 4″ of iron on top of 2′ of oak

Section of anchor chain recovered along with the hull remnants of the CSS Jackson

Section of anchor chain recovered along with the hull remnants of the CSS Jackson

This painting made from the only existing photo of the CSS Jackson depicts what the ship would have looked like.

This painting made from the only existing photo of the CSS Jackson depicts what the ship would have looked like.

The remains of the CSS Chattahoochee also feature prominently at the National Civil War Naval Museum. The Chattahoochee was a steam-powered gunboat built in Georgia and served in Florida. After she suffered a boiler explosion in May 1863 she was towed to Columbus for repairs. Later in the war, as Confederate held territory shank, she was scuttled in the Muscogee River in December 1864. Almost 100 years later, her remains were located in Fort Benning and raised. Along with the remains of the hull, the Chattahoochee section of the museum also features a variety of equipment and weapons used by Civil War sailors. It also shows uniforms that would have been worn by both US and CS Navy sailors.

Archaeological remnants of the gunboat CSS Chatahoochee

Archaeological remnants of the gunboat CSS Chattahoochee

Archaeological remnants of the gunboat CSS Chatahoochee

Archaeological remnants of the gunboat CSS Chattahoochee

Archaeological remnants of the gunboat CSS Chatahoochee

Archaeological remnants of the gunboat CSS Chattahoochee

Model of the CSS Chatahoochee showing what she would have looked like during the Civil War

Model of the CSS Chattahoochee showing what she would have looked like during the Civil War

Weapons and equipment used by Civil War Sailors

Weapons and equipment used by Civil War Sailors

Weapons and equipment used by Civil War sailors

Weapons and equipment used by Civil War sailors

Weapons and equipment used by Civil War sailors

Weapons and equipment used by Civil War sailors

Modern recreations of Civil War sailor uniforms; the US and CS navies would have used similar uniforms (the blue US Navy Round Cap is an actual Civil War cap)

Modern recreations of Civil War sailor uniforms; the US and CS navies would have used similar uniforms (the blue US Navy Round Cap is an actual Civil War cap)

The museum features recreations of the turret of the ironclad USS Monitor, the ironclad CSS Albemarle, and US Navy Admiral David G. Farragut’s flagship,the sloop-of-war USS Hartford. You’re able to walk through the recreations of the Albemarle and Hartford, gaining and appreciation for the working and living conditions of Civil War sailors.

Recreation of the ironclad USS Monitor's turret.

Recreation of the ironclad USS Monitor’s turret.

Recreation of the USS Hartford

Recreation of the USS Hartford

Model of the USS Hartford

Model of the USS Hartford

Admiral's cutter (not a recreation!) from the USS Hartford

Admiral’s cutter (not a recreation!) from the USS Hartford

Recreation of the ironclad CSS Albemarle

Recreation of the ironclad CSS Albemarle

Model of the CSS Albermarle

Model of the CSS Albermarle

A look inside the CSS Albemarle

A look inside the CSS Albemarle

Cramped working conditions inside the CSS Albemarle

Cramped working conditions inside the CSS Albemarle

The National Civil War Naval Museum is a terrific museum. It was an extraordinary feeling to stand beside the remains of 150 year old warships. I thoroughly enjoyed my visit and think it would be a great visit for anyone with an interest in military, naval, or Civil War History.


1 Comment

  1. […] trip from Savannah to Columbus on 10/11 January to visit the National Infantry Museum and the National Civil War Naval Museum in Columbus as well as the Little White House in Warm Springs. Along the way, I listened to amateur […]

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