Home » Nature » Savannah NWR; 02 March 2014

Savannah NWR; 02 March 2014

Archives

Savannah – After catching the departure of a couple of Hawaii ANG F-22s from Savannah International Airport, I visited the Savannah NWR yesterday afternoon to “recharge the batteries” after another not-so-good week and take some photos.  With winter winding down, there weren’t as many migratory waterfowl to see but there were still some Blue Winged Teal and Northern Shovelers around as well as the always present Anhingas, Coots, Egrets, Gallinules, and Herons.  Although Friday had been cold, the general trend of the last week or so has been warmer weather, so I saw more alligators and turtles than I have the last few trips over.  By my count, I saw 19 alligators during my drive around the wildlife drive and while walking the trails.

Female Anhinga

Female Anhinga

Male Anhinga

Male Anhinga

2 female and 1 male Blue Winged Teal feeding.

2 female and 1 male Blue Winged Teal feeding.

Male and female Blue Winged Teal feeding.

Male and female Blue Winged Teal feeding.

Female and Male Blue Winged Teal feeding.

Female and Male Blue Winged Teal feeding.

2 male and 1 female Blue Winged Teal.

2 male and 1 female Blue Winged Teal.

Male (top) and female (bottom) Northern Shovelers.

Male (top) and female (bottom) Northern Shovelers.

Male Northern Shoveler.

Male Northern Shoveler.

Great Egret with a following of Glossy Ibis.

Great Egret with a following of Glossy Ibis.

This group of birds was fun to watch, it was almost like a game of follow the leader.  The Great Egret was moving along and it was like the Glossy Ibis were saying “let’s just go wherever the Egret goes and do whatever the Egret does.”  Wherever the Egret went, that group of Ibis were right behind it.  I also had fun watching the juvenile Little Blue Heron below hunting; I just pulled over and stayed in the car to take photos to keep from spooking it because it was right along the edge of bank.

Juvenile Little Blue Heron

Juvenile Little Blue Heron

Juvenile Little Blue Heron hunting

Juvenile Little Blue Heron hunting

Juvenile Little Blue Heron - Success!

Juvenile Little Blue Heron – Success!

Great Blue Heron in flight.

Great Blue Heron in flight.

Great Blue Heron in flight.

Great Blue Heron in flight.

I came up on a pair of raccoons during the drive around the wildlife drive but they weren’t as at ease with me as the one I saw at Harris Neck awhile back.  As soon as I moved around the back of the car to take some photos, they took off across a trail and into hiding.

Racoons at full speed across the trail.

Racoons at full speed across the trail.

Just about to disappear into hiding among the marsh grass.

Just about to disappear into hiding among the marsh grass.

I saw a lot of turtles during this visit to the NWR, I didn’t keep count but I probably saw more turtles than I did alligators.  I saw turtles all over the place but I didn’t see many alligators until probably the last 1/3 of the Laurel Island Wildlife Drive.  On the last few trips, most of the alligators were on the left side of the road but this time, there were also quite a few in the diversion canal on the right side of the road.

Small Yellow Bellied Slider sunning.

Small Yellow Bellied Slider sunning.

Two turtles and a very small alligator.

Two turtles and a very small alligator.

Yellow Bellied Slider

Yellow Bellied Slider

Small Yellow Bellied Slider sunning on a log.

Small Yellow Bellied Slider sunning on a log.

Yellow Bellied Sliders sunning on a log in the "Turtle Hole."

Yellow Bellied Sliders sunning on a log in the “Turtle Hole.”

More Yellow Bellied Sliders sunning on logs in the "Turtle Hole."

More Yellow Bellied Sliders sunning on logs in the “Turtle Hole.”

A small alligator in the swimming in the "Turtle Hole."

A small alligator in the swimming in the “Turtle Hole.”

Alligator sunning on a mud bank.

Alligator sunning on a mud bank.

What all do you see in this photo?

What all do you see in this photo?

Alligator sunning on a canal bank.

Alligator sunning on a canal bank.

Alligator sunning on a canal bank.

Alligator sunning on a canal bank.

Alligator sunning on a canal bank.

Alligator sunning on a canal bank.

Alligator sunning on a canal bank.

Alligator sunning on a canal bank.

Alligator sunning on a mud bank.

Alligator sunning on a mud bank.

Warning, Radio Geek stuff to follow

The Laurel Island Wildlife Drive at the Savannah National Wildlife Refuge has recently added some low power AM transmitters on 1610 kHz at various locations along the drive to provide information on the refuge and the wildlife within it.  There are five of them, mostly located in inconspicuous places; some are obvious but all of them are visible if you’re looking for them.  They’re all configured the same with one exception, some have solar panels and some don’t.  I’m guessing the ones near commercial power sources run off of commercial power while the ones in the interior of the refuge use solar power.

Low power AM transmitter at the beginning of the Laurel Hill Wildlife Drive.

Low power AM transmitter at the beginning of the Laurel Hill Wildlife Drive.

Low power AM transmitter near the halfway point of the Laurel Hill Wildlife Drive (note the Solar panel).

Low power AM transmitter near the halfway point of the Laurel Hill Wildlife Drive (note the Solar panel).


Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: