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Charleston, SC Road Trip: Fort Moultrie

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When the visit to Fort Sumter didn’t pan out, Fort Moultrie was one of the two places I used as an alternative.  I wasn’t able to stay as long as I would have liked to because I had to be at Patriot’s Point by 1:15 PM to see if that boat would go out (which it did not), so it is definitely on the re-visit list for the future.  Even though I didn’t get to go out to Fort Sumter, I could see Castle Pinckney, another harbor fort, in the distance through the mist and rain from the Visitors Center pier using the camera’s zoom lens:

Fort Sumter in the distance from the Fort Sumter Visitors Center Pier.

Castle Pinckney in the distance from the Fort Sumter Visitors Center Pier.

Fort Moultrie is a military history gem that represents the history of US coastal defense from the colonial period all the way to World War II.  It served as a part of our coastal defenses from a palmetto log fort during the Colonial period all the way to a reinforced concrete Harbor Entrance Control Post in World War II, with everything from the Civil War, Spanish American War,  and World War I in between.   There are weapons and fortifications at the monument from all of the parts of it’s history, making one of the most unique forts I’ve visited.  It also features exhibits on slavery and African Culture in the area, something you can’t overlook in this region.

Fort Moultrie Visitors Center

Fort Moultrie Visitors Center

Revolutionary War artillery display in the Visitors Center.

Revolutionary War artillery display in the Visitors Center.

Civil War era artillery display in the Visitors Center.

Civil War era artillery display in the Visitors Center.

World War I era artillery display in the Visitors Center.

World War I era artillery display in the Visitors Center.

African Culture Display at Fort Moultrie.

African Culture Display at Fort Moultrie.

Slave Shackles at Fort Moultrie.

Slave Shackles at Fort Moultrie.

World War II coastal defense - the Harbor Entrance Control Post.

World War II coastal defense – the Harbor Entrance Control Post.

A front view of the World War II Harbor Entrance Control Post.

A front view of the World War II Harbor Entrance Control Post with Battery Bingham in the foreground.

WVEP, the Harbor Entrance Control Post's radio station located deep within the earth and concrete works.

WVEP, the Harbor Entrance Control Post’s radio station located deep within the earth and concrete works.

Representing 1898-1939, Battery Bingham.

Representing 1898-1939, Battery Bingham.

Also representing 1898-1939, Battery McCorkle.

Also representing 1898-1939, Battery McCorkle.

Side angle of Battery McCorkle.

Side angle of Battery McCorkle.

Rodman Guns representing the 1870s.

Rodman Guns representing the 1870s.

Columbiad representing the Civil War era.

Columbiad representing the Civil War era.

Smoothbore cannon representing the period between 1809 and 1860.

Smoothbore cannon representing the period between 1809 and 1860.

Seminole leader Osceola was imprisoned at Fort Moultrie. He died there on 30 January 1838 and was buried with full military honors.

Seminole leader Osceola was imprisoned at Fort Moultrie. He died there on 30 January 1838 and was buried with full military honors.

Posts are still come about the North Charleston and American LaFrance Fire Museum and Patriots Point including the USS Yorktown, USS Clamagore, and USS Laffey.


4 Comments

  1. […] Photos from Patriots Point including the USS Yorktown, USS Clamagore, and USS Laffey are still to come.  You can find photos from Fort Moultrie here. […]

  2. […] also have blog posts up with photos from the other monuments and museums I visite:  Fort Moultrie and the North Charleston and American LaFrance Fire Museum.  Photos of aircraft from Patriots […]

  3. […] also have blog posts up with photos from the other monuments and museums I visited:  Fort Moultrie, theNorth Charleston and American LaFrance Fire Museum, and Patriots Point.   Scanning and […]

  4. […] top of Battery Huger and look across the harbor where the CSS Hunley sunk to Sullivans Island and Fort Moultrie. Likewise you can look across the harbor to Morris Island where Fort Wagner was; if you’ve […]

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