About the Blog:

Welcome to KF4LMT's Shack. I blog on scanning and monitoring, amateur radio, and motor sports. MilAir, Fire/EMS, and Search and Rescue communications are the focus of my scanning posts. Amateur Radio posts mostly focus on events I participate in and mobile operating, which is my primary means of getting on HF. Sports Car and IndyCar racing are what most of my motor sports posts are about.

Feel free to leave a comment or drop me a line at kf4lmt @ gmail.com.

Sorry, but I don't program scanners – it has led to too many requests that I just don't have time to accommodate.

If you're looking for me on Facebook, I'm no longer there. I deactivated my account... and I'm enjoying life more for it.

Savannah Weather

Brunswick Weather

Upcoming Ham Radio Events

  • ARRL School Club Roundup 8 February 2016 – 12 February 2016
  • 145th Anniversary, Fort Point, San Francisco 10 February 2016 – 17 February 2016 Healdsburg, CA 95448, USA Feb 10-Feb 17, 0000Z-2359Z, N6F, Healdsburg, CA. Will Pattullo, AE6YB. 28.450 21.265 14.265 7.265. QSL. N6F - Will Pattullo, 161 Presidential Cir, Healdsburg, CA 95448. Special Event commemorating the 145th anniversary (February 15, 1861), of the completion of Fort Point in San Francisco. www.qrz.com/db/AE6YB
  • Frozen Lake Portable: Ice Station W0JH 13 February 2016 – 14 February 2016 Stillwater, MN, USA Feb 13-Feb 15, 1600Z-2345Z, W0JH, Stillwater, MN. Stillwater (MN) Amateur Radio Association and Radio City Inc. 21.360 14.260 7.260 3.860. Certificate. Shel Mann, N0DRX, IceStationW0JH2016@radioham.org, certificate by email, only. W0JH QSL Certificates will ONLY be sent via e-mail in PDF format. (Send requests to: IceStationW0JH2016@radioham.org). W0JH is operating portable from a frozen lake in Washington…
  • George Washington Birthday 13 February 2016 – 14 February 2016 Alexandria, VA, USA Feb 13-Feb 14, 1400Z-1800Z, K4US, Alexandria, VA. Mt Vernon Amateur Radio Club. 14.260 7.040. QSL. MVARC, PO Box 7234, Alexandria, VA 22307. MVARC.org
  • H L Hunley Commemorative Event 13 February 2016 – 18 February 2016 Goose Creek, SC, USA Feb 13-Feb 18, 0000Z-2359Z, N4H, Goose Creek, SC. Trident Amateur Radio Club. 28.350 14.262 7.195 7.117. Certificate. Trident Amateur Radio Club, PO Box 60732, North Charleston, SC 29419. For information on Facebook www.facebook.com/tridentamateurradioclub or tridenthams.org/hunley.htm
  • Worked All NCDXA "RST" Stations 15 February 2016 – 27 March 2016 Feb 15-Mar 27, 0000Z-2359Z, KL7RST, Alaska. North Country DX Association. All bands, all modes. Certificate. North Country DX Association, K7ICE, 486 Town Center Place, Apt 313, Columbia, SC 29229. A Special Event from KL7, VY1, VE8 and VY0!(KL7RST/VE8RST/VY1RST/VY0RST) Certificate for working one station; additional certificates available for working other combinations of stations. For complete information,…
  • CARS Net 14 February 2016 at 21:30 – 22:00 Savannah, GA, USA Coastal Amateur Radio Society Weekly Net, 442.700+ Repeater
  • 2016 Daytona 500 Speedweeks 17 February 2016 – 21 February 2016 Daytona Beach, FL, USA Feb 17-Feb 21, 1300Z-2359Z, N4DAB, Daytona Beach, FL. Daytona Beach CERT Amateur Radio Club. 21.260 14.245 7.240. Certificate & QSL. Daytona Beach CERT ARC, c/o Daytona Beach PD - Steve Szabo, 129 Valor Blvd, Daytona Beach, FL 32114. www.daytonacert.net
  • ARRL Intl DX Contest CW 20 February 2016 – 21 February 2016
  • George Washington's Birthday 20 February 2016 – 22 February 2016 George, WA, USA Feb 20-Feb 22, 0001Z-2359Z, WS7G, George, WA. Columbia Basin DX Club. 14.322 18.135 7.177 3.810. Certificate. Brian J. Nielson, 11650 Road 1 SE, Moses Lake, WA 98837. cbn.homestead.com/ws7g.html

Sentry Savannah 2016 Underway

Savannah – On Saturday,  I posted about the arrival of F-16s and F-22s at the Savannah Combat Readiness Training Center/Air Dominance Center and surmised that an exercise was about to begin. That exercise began today and based on airspace requests I heard on the radios, it’s a Sentry Savannah exercise. It is comprised of 175th FS, SD ANG F-16s, 43rd FS F-22s from Tyndall AFB, and 2nd FTS T-38s from Tyndall AFB operating out of the Savannah CRTC/Air Dominance Center supported by KC-135s from the 161st ARW, AZ ANG and 190th ARW, KS ANG operating out of Hunter AAF. They’re flying morning and afternoon sorties with the bulk of the activity in the offshore SUAs but also with a few flights going into the Coastal MOA. Frequencies in use are, at the core, the same as used in previous iterations of Sentry Savannah exercises:

Frequencies
119.100/257.800 – Savannah Tower
120.400/353.775 – Savannah Approach/Departure
125.300/371.875 – Savannah Approach/Departure
277.400/126.750 – Jax Center Brunswick Low
282.200/124.675 – Jax Center Jekyll Low
363.200/132.925 – Jax Center Allendale/Savannah Low

120.950/284.500 – Sealord North Primary

265.400 – NORAD Discrete; aerial refueling
288.400 – NORAD Discrete; aerial refueling
235.900 – aerial refueling

293.600 – NORAD Discrete; intercept control
316.300 – NORAD Discrete; intercept control
311.300 – 117th ACS; intercept control
224.800 – Townsend Range/Coastal MOA
269.350 – Coastal MOA

138.625/237.000 – CRTC Ops

139.700 – 175th FS air-to-air
227.275 – 175th FS air-to-air
240.500 – 175th FS air-to-air

244.900 – 43rd FS air-to-air
255.675 – 43rd FS air-to-air
256.750 – 43rd FS air-to-air
288.900 – 43rd FS air-to-air
367.900 – 43rd FS air-to-air

320.600 – 2nd FTS air-to-air

234.800 – 125th FW Aux 5
253.700 – 125th FW Aux 6
314.200 – 125th FW Aux 7

142.3625 – CRTC (NAC 293); Ground Support

Callsigns
LOBO – F-16CM, 175th FS
BARK – F-16CM, 175th FS
DINGO – F-16CM, 175th FS

ATLAS – F-22A, 43rd FS
HORNET – F-22A, 43rd FS
STINGER – F-22A, 43rd FS
WASP – F-22A, 43rd FS

BEAGLE – T-38, 2nd FTS
HOUND – T-38, 2nd FTS

FANG – F-15C, 125th FW
SNAKE – F-15C, 125th FW

COPPER – KC-135R, 161st ARW
WYLIE – KC-135R, 190th ARW

EDDIE 94 – KC-135R, 63-7993, 121st ARW
POSSE 77 – C-130H, 79-0477, 120th AW
RHODY 42 – C-130J, 99-1432, 143rd AW

STEALTH – 117th ACS

Tailnumbers
88-0428 – F-16CM, 175th FS
88-0471 – F-16CM, 175th FS
88-0474 – F-16CM, 175th FS
88-0485 – F-16CM, 175th FS
88-0492 – F-16CM, 175th FS
88-0512 – F-16CM, 175th FS
89-2064 – F-16CM, 175th FS
89-2086 – F-16CM, 175th FS
89-2105 – F-16CM, 175th FS
89-2125 – F-16CM, 175th FS
89-2174 – F-16CM, 175th FS

00-4012 – F-22A, 43rd FS
00-4016 – F-22A, 43rd FS
01-4019 – F-22A, 43rd FS
01-4025 – F-22A, 43rd FS
01-4027 – F-22A, 43rd FS
02-4029 – F-22A, 43rd FS
02-4030 – F-22A, 43rd FS
02-4035? – F-22A, 43rd FS
02-4036 – F-22A, 43rd FS
02-4040? – F-22A, 43rd FS
03-4042 – F-22A, 43rd FS
03-4043 – F-22A, 43rd FS

61-0904 – T-38A, 2nd FTS
62-3660 – T-38A, 2nd FTS
62-3706 – T-38A, 2nd FTS
62-3715 – T-38A, 2nd FTS
67-14833 – T-38A, 2nd FTS
68-8150 – T-38A, 2nd FTS
68-8172 – T-38A, 2nd FTS
68-8186 – T-38A, 2nd FTS

79-0477 – C-130H, 120th AW
99-1432 – C-130J, 143rd AW

62-3516 – KC-135R, 161st ARW
63-8036 – KC-135R, 161st ARW
59-1507 – KC-135R, 190th ARW
63-7993 – KC-135R, 121st ARW

If you enjoy listening to military aviation, are an aircraft spotter, or just enjoy watching airplanes, the next few weeks will provide a great opportunity in the Savannah area. Due to work and a few other upcoming issues, I’m not sure how many opportunities I’ll have to listen in, but if I do and get any updates, I’ll post them to the blog. Be aware that there is also heavy activity out of MCAS Beaufort due to a Marine Division Tactics Course,  but it is unrelated to the exercise based out of Savannah.

 


Sources:  Radio monitoring, Mode-S data, and spotter reports

VMFA-122 Marine Division Tactics Course

Savannah – Aircraft, pilots, and crews from VMFA-122 at MCAS Beaufort are currently taking part in a Marine Division Tactics Course (MDTC). VMFT-401 is at Beaufort for the MDTC to fly as OpFor for the training. The MDTC is a “graduate level air-to-air school” for select pilots and crews; it is expected that those pilots and crews will take what they learn back to their squadron and share it with the rest of their unit.

VMFA-122 and VMFT-401 have been very active in the offshore SUAs flying multiple sorties in the morning and afternoons. VMFA-122 has not been using their normal callsign NIKEL for the MDTC sorties, they’ve been using LATCH and SALEM. VMFT-401 have been using their normal callsign SNIPER. Additionally, the VMFA-122 MDTC flights have been using VMFA(AW)-224 Tac frequencies or air-to-air while VMFA(AW)-224 is deployed to Japan. VMFT-401 is using other MCAS Beaufort squadron’s Tac frequencies for air-to-air. While training offshore, VMFA-122 flights have been getting intercept control from DEUCE (MACS-2) while VMFT-401 has been working with a ground station I haven’t caught the callsign of yet (in previous visits it has been KREMLIN). Frequencies to catch their activity on are:

313.700 – SEALORD North Secondary
349.800 – W-137 Discrete
376.900 – W-137 Discrete

344.200 – Old VMFA(AW)-224 Base; MDTC F/A-18 Base
250.300 – VMFA(AW)-224 Tac 1; MDTC air-to-air
258.900 – VMFA(AW)-224 Tac 2; MDTC air-to-air

305.800 – VMFA(AW)-224 Base; VMFT-401 Base
274.500 – VMFA-115 Tac 3; VMFT-401 air-to-air
376.425 – VMFA-251 Tac 3; VMFT-401 air-to-air


Sources: Radio monitoring and DVIDS article “Pilots, maintainers train during MDTC

 

Mystery Mode-S Hex Code – AE0441

Savannah – Over the last year, I’ve had hits on a mystery Mode-S code, AE0441, that I haven’t been able to identify. I have never been able to tie it to anything I’ve heard on local air traffic control or Jacsksonville ARTCC frequencies (altitudes shown indicated it would have been on local ATC or area Jax ARTCC low sector frequencies). Online research hasn’t been able to identify it either. I’ve seen AE0441 on the Mode-S receiver seven times since January 2015:

  1. 14 Jan 2015, 1835z-1847z, start altitude 7750 ft, ending altitude 7725 ft
  2. 15 Jan 2015, 1823z-1839z, start altitude 8675 ft, ending altitude 8750 ft
  3. 21 Jan 2015, 1611z-1622z, start altitude 4575 ft, ending altitude 4550 ft
  4. 22 Jan 2015, 1642z-1651z, start altitude 3610 ft, ending altitude 3585 ft
  5. 20 Feb 2015, 1806z-1857z, start altitude 5475 ft, ending altitude 6500 ft
  6. 6 Dec 2015, 1343z-1351z , start altitude 11525 ft, ending altitude 11525 ft
  7. 24 Jan 2016, 1416z-1427z, start altitude 7750 ft, ending altitude 11525 ft

In addition to that info, the live-military-mode-s website shows hits on AE0441 in Orlando, FL, Oviedo, FL, and Hampton, VA. Orlando happens to be the other location in showed in for the today’s hit (24 Jan 2016). Perhaps Orlando and Oviedo (6 Dec 2015 and 24 Jan 2016) could indicate it was something coming out of or operating near MacDill AFB or CGAS Clearwater? Perhaps the Hampton hits (12 Jan 2016 and 13 Jan 2016) were something coming out of or operating out of NAS  Norfolk?

This morning (24 Jan 2016) when I was seeing it, once again I couldn’t hear aircaft on Savannah Approach/Departure, ZJX Brunswick Low, ZJX Jekyll Low, or ZJX Savannah Low that I could have tied it to. I did, however, hear Savannah Approach point out and unidentified aircraft to an aircraft they were controlling; that aircraft responded that they could see “a rotary wing of some sort.” Given that there Mode-S hits near CGAS Clearwater and NAS Norfolk, that could gel with a helicopter, but when I look at the data above, it seems that 7750, 8675, and 11525 ft altitudes could be a bit high for a helicopter. The “rotary wing of some sort” description may not have even been directed at AE0441 for all I know.

Out of curiosity, I checked some codes around it; AE0440 is also an unidentified code, but AE0442 is a CN-235 with the 427th SOS and AE0443 is a 108th Wing C-32B. Based on that, I don’t think there is anything to be pulled out of a pattern on the Mode-S code assignments.

In short, AE0441 is still a mystery. If anyone has any ideas or information, I’d love to hear it!

Exercise at the Savannah Combat Readiness Training Center/Air Dominance Center?

Savannah – Yesterday, F-22As from the 43rd FS at Tyndall AFB, F-16s from the 114th FW, South Dakota ANG, KC-135s, and a C-130 arrived at the Savannah CRTC/Air Dominance Center and Hunter AAF. The F-22As arrived as HORNET, WASP, and STINGER flights in the morning and the F-16s arrived as LOBO, SPARK, and possibly TALON flights in the afternoon. Not too long after the F-22s arrived, POSSE 77 arrived at Savannah; it showed as 79-0477 on Mode-S and that tail number shows that it a Nevada ANG aircraft. The callsign, however, is indicative of it being a Montana ANG aircraft. Shortly after the South Dakota F-16s arrived at Savannah, COPPER 02 and COPPER 03, KC-135s from the 161st ARW, Arizona ANG arrived at Hunter AAF. These are likely associated with the aircraft at the CRTC; last year some of the tankers for Sentry Savannah exercises worked out of Hunter. Later in the evening, EDDIE 94, a 121st ARW, Ohio ANG KC-135 arrived at Savannah and departed after a quick turnaround; it checked in on 237.000, the CRTC Ops frequency prior to its arrival, so I’m guessing that it’s associated with the rest of the aircraft at the CRTC. Tail numbers from the arrivals are:

00-4012 – F-22A, 43rd FS
00-4016 – F-22A, 43rd FS
01-4019 – F-22A, 43rd FS
01-4025 – F-22A, 43rd FS
01-4027 – F-22A, 43rd FS
02-4029 – F-22A, 43rd FS
02-4030 – F-22A, 43rd FS
02-4035? – F-22A, 43rd FS
02-4036 – F-22A, 43rd FS
02-4040? – F-22A, 43rd FS
03-4042 – F-22A, 43rd FS
03-4043 – F-22A, 43rd FS

88-0428 – F-16CM, 114th FW
88-0471 – F-16CM, 114th FW
88-0474 – F-16CM, 114th FW
88-0485 – F-16CM, 114th FW
88-0492 – F-16CM, 114th FW
88-0512 – F-16CM, 114th FW
89-2064 – F-16CM, 114th FW
89-2086 – F-16CM, 114th FW
89-2105 – F-16CM, 114th FW
89-2125 – F-16CM, 114th FW
89-2174 – F-16CM, 114th FW

79-0477- C-130H, 120th AW or 152nd AW?

62-3516 – KC-135R, 161st ARW
63-8036 – KC-135R, 161st ARW
63-7993 – KC-135R, 121st ARW

The 43rd FS F-22s used 256.750 and 288.900 for air-to-air during the arrival. One of the SD ANG F-16 flights were using 139.700 for air-to-air, but I wasn’t able to find an air-to-air for the other flights because I was out mobile at the time. 237.000 and 138.625 were both in use for Ops at the CRTC.

All of this seems to point toward a Sentry Savannah exercise beginning in the not to distant future. It’s a bit earlier than the February start times the last couple of years, but we’ll keep an eye on the skies, an ear on the radios, and a watch on the news to see what pops up.


Sources:  Radio monitoring, Mode-S data, and spotter reports

 

Review: Wild Bill Donovan

Wild Bill Donovan
Wild Bill Donovan by Douglas C. Waller
My rating: 4 of 5 stars

Wild Bill Donovan by Douglas Waller is a biography of Bill Donovan, the found of the OSS (Office of Strategic Services) which was the World War II forerunner of today’s CIA (Central Intelligence Agency). In addition to a biography of Donovan, it also serves a secondary purpose as a history of the OSS. In both, I find Waller’s accounts objective and fair. This isn’t a work of hero worship, nor is it an attempt to tear Donovan down, instead it’s an unbiased account of both Donovan’s life and the OSS.

Waller traces Donovan’s life from childhood to death, but the majority of the book focuses on the OSS and World War II. He relates Donovan’s childhood in Buffalo, NY and shows it shaped him as an adult. He then details Donovan’s business, military, and political career showing he connections he made and networking he developed that would be important later on. Throughout it all, Waller continues to tell the tale of Donovan’s family life, one of almost constant separation, absent parenthood, and tragedy. This is one of the main areas where it’s obvious he’s giving a balanced portrayal of Donavan; he doesn’t gloss over Donovan’s shortcomings as a husband and parent. The portrayal of the OSS and World War II years are also balanced. Waller details Donovan’s skills and shortcomings as a leader and how both pushed the OSS ahead and held it back, leading to mistakes. At the same time, the book also shows just how fragmented and chaotic US intelligence efforts during World War II were; it also details the political and personal conflicts that kept intelligence efforts divided. Throughout the latter part of the book, you see the seeds of the CIA being planted. Personalities like Dulles, Colby, Casey, Helms, Angleton – you see them all pop up in the OSS.

I thoroughly enjoyed reading Waller’s Wild Bill Donovan; it was informative and engaging. It’s also well researched and well documented, this is not a book based on rumor and myth. Published in 2011, it is a book published in an era where “black ops” can be worshiped, intelligence services belittled, and personalities like Donovan put on a pedestal (or trashed based on one’s perspective) but Waller doesn’t fall into those traps. He treats both Donovan and the OSS with objectivity and presents both their successes and their shortcomings. If you’re interested in World War II, Intelligence/Espionage, a good biography, or just a good story Wild Bill Donovan would be a great selection.

View all my reviews

Review: Conquest: The English Kingdom of France 1417-1450

Conquest: The English Kingdom of France 1417-1450
Conquest: The English Kingdom of France 1417-1450 by Juliet Barker
My rating: 4 of 5 stars

Conquest: The English Kingdom of France 1417-1450 by Juliet Barker is the follow up to her book Agincourt: Henry V and the Battle That Made England. After reading Agincourt, I was interested in finding out what happened afterward and found that Barker wrote Conquest, which fills that bill. She picks up where she left off in Agincourt and tells the story Henry V’s attempt to create an “English Kingdom in France” that he believed was rightly his and of the end of The Hundred Years’ War.

Conquest is broken up into five sections that with the exception of Part Two divides the end of The Hundred Years’ War into relevant sections. The first, Establishing the Kingdom, covers the invasion of and conquest of France, the death of Henry V, the birth of Henry VI, and his inheritance of the English Kingdom in France. In the second part, Barker spends a lot of time telling the story of Jehanne D’Arc (Joan of Arc)’s rise, campaigns, capture, trial, and execution. Part Three deals with “The War of Attrition” and tells the story of how fortunes changed and the French began to gain the upper hand. In Part Four, “The Search for Peace,” the road to the end of the English Kingdom in France is explored before that end is described in Part Five “The Truce of Tours.”

What I learned in my reading is that the English lost their Kingdom in France in much the same way the French lost the Battle of Agincourt. First of all, Henry V simply bit off more than England could chew. Ultimately they didn’t have the resources to win and hold the Kingdom. One wonders had Henry lived would he have realized this and decided to back off? Regardless, Henry V died and over time, for a variety of reasons, the quality of leadership both at home and in the English Kingdom in France deteriorated as the quality of the French leadership improved. By the end, the shoe was on the other foot. England had lost their advantage in leadership, in unity of command, and ran out of resources to prosecute the win whereas the French learned from their mistakes, unified, husbanded their resources, and overran the English.

I thoroughly enjoyed reading Conquest. A long book that covers over 30 years of conflict could easily become tedious, but Barker avoids that trap. This a very interesting and engaging read. Even though you know the English ultimately lose Barker keeps it interesting developing personalities and describing the rivalries that drove the war. I particularly enjoyed her development of the Duke of Bedford and how she told the story of the role the Burgundians played between the English and French. My only problem with Conquest, as it was with Agincourt, is the lack of maps. When you’re dealing with the capture of towns and how the capture or fall of those towns influenced what happened in other towns and cities, maps make it a lot easier to visualize and understand how it happened. For some reason, some authors and/or printers (I’m not sure who made the decisions in this case) just don’t understand the importance of maps to military histories. The Kindle version did not have those maps, and because that’s the version I read it gets four stars. If the print version has maps then I would give the print version five stars. Otherwise, this a terrific book and one that, if you’re interested in learning more about the end of The Hundred Years’ War, you should add to your reading list.

View all my reviews

A Visit to the USS Yorktown (CV-10); 13 January 2016

Charleston, SC – Two years ago, I visited the USS Yorktown (CV-10) at Patriot’s Point and posted some photos from my visit. This year I made another visit while making another attempt to see Fort Sumter. Instead of posting photos that are repeats of the 2014 post, this year I’ll try to post some different ones.

USS Yorktown (CV-10) as seen from the shore.

USS Yorktown (CV-10) as seen from the shore.

USS Yorktown (CV-10) as seen from Charleston Harbor

USS Yorktown (CV-10) as seen from Charleston Harbor

USS Laffey (DD-724), "The Ship That Wouldn't Die," survived multiple bomb hits and strikes from 6 Kamikazes during battle off of Okinawa

USS Laffey (DD-724), “The Ship That Wouldn’t Die,” survived multiple bomb hits and strikes from 6 Kamikazes during battle off of Okinawa

USS Yorktown (CV-10) Ship's Bell

USS Yorktown (CV-10) Ship’s Bell

While touring the Yorktown on this trip, it struck me while I was in VF-1’s Ready Room that I was standing in a ship that was present at and played a key role in the Marianas Turkey Shoot, a battle that helped break the back of the Imperial Japanese Navy. It gave me pause and the historical significance of this ship really sunk in. Even though the flight deck isn’t in the same configuration that it was during World War II, you look down onto it from the island and you think of all of the history that the Yorktown not only saw, but was an active participant in. You can’t help but think about the men who lived and fought aboard her, especially those that died aboard and flying off of her.

VF-1's Ready Room - it was here where it hit me that I was standing in a ship that was present at the Marianas Turkey Shoot

VF-1’s Ready Room – it was here where it hit me that I was standing in a ship that was present at the Marianas Turkey Shoot

Looking out across the Yorktown's flight deck from the Island

Looking out across the Yorktown’s flight deck from the Island

Looking out across the Yorktown's flight deck from the Island

Looking out across the Yorktown’s flight deck from the Island

Looking out across the Yorktown's flight deck from the Island

Looking out across the Yorktown’s flight deck from the Island

This next series of photos focuses on radar, communications, and computer technology aboard the Yorktown. The Master Indicator Control Room below fed radar signals out to the various radar displays throughout the ship, including the Air Traffic Control Center and the Combat Information Center (CIC). Radio 3 shows how a radio room aboard the Yorktown was set up; based on the calendar on the wall, it’s in a configuration circa 1965. Finally, there’s a photo of a computer room aboard the ship, equipped with vintage keypunch machines and a card sorting machine.

The Yorktown's Master Indicator Control Room, where radar signals were distributed to the various radar displays throughout the ship

The Yorktown’s Master Indicator Control Room, where radar signals were distributed to the various radar displays throughout the ship

The Air Traffic Control  Center aboard USS Yorktown (CV-10) at Patriot's Point

The Air Traffic Control Center aboard USS Yorktown (CV-10) at Patriot’s Point

The CIC (Combat Information Center) aboard the USS Yorktown

The CIC (Combat Information Center) aboard the USS Yorktown

The CIC (Combat Information Center) aboard the USS Yorktown

The CIC (Combat Information Center) aboard the USS Yorktown

The CIC (Combat Information Center) aboard the USS Yorktown

The CIC (Combat Information Center) aboard the USS Yorktown

The CIC (Combat Information Center) aboard the USS Yorktown

The CIC (Combat Information Center) aboard the USS Yorktown

The CIC (Combat Information Center) aboard the USS Yorktown

The CIC (Combat Information Center) aboard the USS Yorktown

Radio 3 aboard USS Yorktown (CV-10) at Patriot's Point. Note the large coffee pot behind the sign; I've never seen a radio room not fueled by mass quantities of coffee.

Radio 3 aboard USS Yorktown (CV-10) at Patriot’s Point. Note the large coffee pot behind the sign; I’ve never seen a radio room not fueled by mass quantities of coffee.

A look at old school computer equipment - a card sorter and keypunch machines in the Yorktown's computer room

A look at old school computer equipment – a card sorter and keypunch machines in the Yorktown’s computer room

The next two photos have to do with USS Yorktown operations. The first photo below is of two documents on display near the bridge. The one on the left lists the procedures that were used for the burial at sea on 24 November 1943 of men killed in an aircraft crash off of the Gilbert Islands. On the left is the Plan of the Day for 3 December 1943 and the attack on Kwajalein in the Marshall Islands. The second photo is of a model of the Imperial Japanese Navy battleship Yamato; aircraft from the Yorktown took part in the attack that sank the massive battleship. Behind the model is an Imperial Japanese Navy Vice Admiral’s flag, the entire flag measures roughly 12 x 8 feet.

Orders for a burial at sea on 24 November 1943 and the attack on the Marshall Islands on 3 December 1943

Orders for a burial at sea on 24 November 1943 and the attack on the Marshall Islands on 3 December 1943

Model of the Japanese Battleship Yamato, sunk by US Navy carrier aircraft, including some from the Yorktown. Behind the model is a Imperial Japanese Navy Vice Admiral's flag.

Model of the Japanese Battleship Yamato, sunk by US Navy carrier aircraft, including some from the Yorktown. Behind the model is a Imperial Japanese Navy Vice Admiral’s flag.

An exhibit on the Yorktown‘s hangar deck honors the USS Franklin (CV-13). The Franklin was the most heavily damaged aircraft carrier to survive World War II. On 19 March 1945, she was struck by two bombs from a Japanese aircraft. Armed and fueled aircraft in the hangar deck caught fire and the fire spread through the second and third decks, spreading destruction throughout. A total of 807 of her crew members were killed and 487 were wounded. The ship’s bell on display in the Yorktown‘s hangar deck bears testament to the intensity of the fire on board the Franklin, it caused a large crack that runs up the bell’s back.

Mk IV quad mount 40mm Anti-Aircraft Gun from the USS Franklin (CV-13)

Mk IV quad mount 40mm Anti-Aircraft Gun from the USS Franklin (CV-13)

Plaque mounted on the MK IV 40mm gun from the USS Franklin (CV-13)

Plaque mounted on the MK IV 40mm gun from the USS Franklin (CV-13)

Ship's Bell from the USS Franklin (CV-13)

Ship’s Bell from the USS Franklin (CV-13)

Ship's Bell from the USS Franklin (CV-13), note the large crack caused by the heat from damage inflicted by the Japanese attack

Ship’s Bell from the USS Franklin (CV-13), note the large crack caused by the heat from damage inflicted by the Japanese attack

Throughout the Yorktown, you come across exhibits on other ships. One of them is the USS Bogue (CVE-9), an escort carrier that was the center of the most successful submarine hunter-killer group in World War II. The Bogue’s task group sank 11 German U-boats and 2 Japanese submarines. One of the Japansee subs was the RO-501, a former German U-boat returning to Germany from Japan and the other was the I-52, which was transporting raw materials and gold from Japan to Germany. The I-52 was the largest submarine sunk during World War II. The Bogue’s ship’s bell is on display on board the Yorktown. In the battleship exhibit, there is a model of the USS Arizona (BB-39) which was sunk in the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor on 7 December 1941, next to the model is a piece of watertight bulkhead recovered from the Arizona after she was sunk. Also in the battleship exhibit is the last flag flown over the battleship USS South Carolina (BB-29), which saw service in World War I, before she was decommissioned. On the hangar deck, there is a model of and the ship’s bell from the USS Charleston (C-22), a cruiser named after Charleston, SC that was commissioned in 1905 and saw service in World War I.

Ship's bell from the USS Bogue (CVE-9)

Ship’s bell from the USS Bogue (CVE-9)

Model of the USS Arizona (BB-39), sunk in the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor; at the bottom right of the photo is a piece of watertight bulkhead from the Arizona's aft turret

Model of the USS Arizona (BB-39), sunk in the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor; at the bottom right of the photo is a piece of watertight bulkhead from the Arizona’s aft turret

The last flag flown over the battleship USS South Carolina (BB-26) before it was decommissioned in 1920

The last flag flown over the battleship USS South Carolina (BB-26) before it was decommissioned in 1920

Model of the USS Charleston (C-22)

Model of the USS Charleston (C-22)

Ship's Bell from the USS Charleston (C-22)

Ship’s Bell from the USS Charleston (C-22)

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TBM-3E Avenger, BuNo 53842, on static display in the hangar deck of the USS Yorktown (CV-10) at @patriots_point in Charleston, SC. TBM was the designation given to TBF Avenger torpedo bombers manufactured by General Motors during World War II. The TBF/TBM was the heaviest single engine aircraft of WW2. With a fully loaded weight of 17,893 lbs, it could carry a 2000 lb torpedo or 2000 lbs of bombs in its internal bomb bay. It was also the first aircraft to have a compound angle (as seen, the wings folded back against the fuselage) folding wing which allowed more effective storage of aircraft on an aircraft carrier. In addition to its use as a torpedo bomber for attacking surface ships, the TBF/TBM was also used as an anti-submarine, scout, and command aircraft. #aviation #avgeek #militaryaviation #militaryhistory #USSYorktown #WW2 #Charleston #CHS #PatriotsPoint This what remains of the first flag to fly over Fort Sumter (@ftsumternps) after it was surrendered to the Confederates.  It is the flag of the Palmetto Guard, and they raised it after entering the fort on 14 April 1861. Later in the day, it was replaced by the official flag of the Confederate States of America. #history #miltaryhistory #FortSumter #CivilWar #Charleston #CHS This is the flag that flew over Fort Sumter (@ftsumternps) during the Confederate bombardment of 12-13 April 1861. During the bombardment, the flagpole was damaged and the flag fell into the fort. Members of the garrison recovered the flag and re-raised it by nailing it to a makeshift pole. When Fort Sumter was evacuated,  its commander Major Anderson took the flag with him. The Anderson family turned the flag over to War Department in 1905 and it was transferred to the National Park Service in 1954. #history #miltaryhistory #FortSumter #CivilWar #Charleston #CHS A hospital with a piano in its waiting area. Pretty cool. And a lot better than muzak. Sunny Side Up. My favorite breakfast spot in Savannah. The USS Laffey (DD-724) is on display along the side of the USS Yorktown (CV-10) at @patriots_point in Charleston, SC. The Laffey was present at two historic amphibious assaults: D-Day at Normandy in the European Theater and Okinawa in the Pacific Theater. It was at Okinawa that she received the nickname "The Ship That Refused to Die." While on radar picket duty, she was heavily damaged by 4 bombs, 6 Kamikazes, and strafing fire from other aircraft during a Japanese attack. Her crew kept her afloat and the Laffey was repaired and returned to service after World War II to participate in the Crossroads atomic bomb test and the Korean War. She is the only surviving Sumner class Destroyer. #militaryhistory #USSLaffey #USSYorktown #WW2 #Charleston #CHS #PatriotsPoint

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