About the Blog:

Welcome to KF4LMT's Shack. I blog on scanning and monitoring, amateur radio, motor sports, history and books. I also post my amateur nature and wildlife photography.

Feel free to leave a comment or drop me a line at kf4lmt @ gmail.com.

Sorry, but I don't program scanners – it has led to too many requests that I just don't have time to accommodate.

Savannah Weather

Brunswick Weather

Upcoming Ham Radio Events

  • 50th Anniversary of Tuskar Rock Air Tragedy 1 January 2018 – 31 March 2018 Baltimore, Ballylinchy, Baltimore, Co. Cork, Ireland Jan 1-Mar 31, 0000Z-2359Z, EI50AOM, Baltimore, Co. Cork, IRELAND. EI2KA. 21.317 18.127 14.217 7.127. QSL. Tim McKnight, EI2KA, Gortadrohid, Ringarogy Island, Baltimore, Co. Cork, IRELAND. https://www.qrz.com/db/ei50aom  
  • JY1 (King Hussein) Memorial Special Event 1 February 2018 – 28 February 2018 Feb 1-Feb 28, 0000Z-2359Z, Lake Station, IN. Arab QRZ International. 14.250 14.025 7.185 7.025. QSL. Ayman J. Azar, 8261 Decatur St, Lake Station, IN 46405. Look For World Wide Participating Stations, Some Call Signs As Follow: 7X5TV, OD5NJ,OD5YY,4X6TT,SU1HZ,KK4OW, KK4OK, KA2HTV & N9SES www.arabqrz.com/jy  
  • 1914 - 1918 Welland Valley Amateur Radio Society 'Lest we forget' 1 February 2018 – 28 February 2018 In 2016, one of our members Paul G1FJH, decided to research one of his relatives (Harry) who had lost his life in the trenches of the First World War.During his search, he turned up British Army Records including the Regimental Diary which detailed what happened on the day of the battle which took Harry’s life. He…
  • Heinrich Hertz Birthday 24 February 2018 Germantown, TN, USA Feb 24, 1600Z-2200Z, W4NRC, Germantown, TN. Nashoba Amateur Radio Club. 14.255 21.355. QSL. Fred Miller, 8265 Green Holly Cove, Germantown, TN 38138. www.nashobaarc.org  
  • Hastings Naval Depot 75th Anniversary 24 February 2018 Wood River, NE 68883, USA Feb 24, 1500Z-2100Z, W0WWV, Wood River, NE. ARAN. 14.250 7.150. QSL. Michael Matthews KD0QEO, 13330 W Warren, Wood River, NE 68883. The Naval Ammunition Depot is 75 years old February 2018. The Depot produced 40% of all naval munitions for the Second World War and for the Korean War. kd0qeo@gmail.com  
  • CARS Net 25 February 2018 at 21:30 – 22:00 Coastal Amateur Radio Society Weekly Net, 442.700+ Repeater
  • 1914 - 1918 Welland Valley Amateur Radio Society 'Lest we forget' 1 March 2018 – 31 March 2018 In 2016, one of our members Paul G1FJH, decided to research one of his relatives (Harry) who had lost his life in the trenches of the First World War.During his search, he turned up British Army Records including the Regimental Diary which detailed what happened on the day of the battle which took Harry’s life. He…
  • CARS Net 4 March 2018 at 21:30 – 22:00 Coastal Amateur Radio Society Weekly Net, 442.700+ Repeater
  • CARS Meeting 5 March 2018 at 20:00 – 21:00 White Bluff Presbyterian Church, 10710 White Bluff Road, Savannah, GA 31406, United States Coastal Amateur Radio Society Monthley Meeting White Bluff Presbyterian Church, 10710 White Bluff Road, Savannah, GA 31406, United States
  • CARS Net 11 March 2018 at 21:30 – 22:00 Coastal Amateur Radio Society Weekly Net, 442.700+ Repeater

Dissent vs Treason – We Must Not Confuse Dissent With Disloyalty

With these words in his speech in Ohio on Monday, President Trump equated dissent with treason by saying that politicians who didn’t applaud him during his State of the Union Address were un-American and treasonous:

 

“You’re up there. You got half the room going totally crazy, wild, loved everything. They want to do something great for our country, and you have the other side, even on positive news — really positive news — like that, they were like death, un-American. Somebody said treasonous. Yeah, I guess, why not? Can we call that treason? Why not? I mean they certainly didn’t seem to love our country very much.”

 

President Trump’s statement couldn’t be farther from true. You might be able to argue that the Democrats were impolite and you may disagree with their position, but their actions are not un-American and they are not treasonous. In fact, their actions are protected by the Constitution – they have freedom of expression. Trump’s words are not the words of a President of the United States, they are the words of a despot or a tyrant. Press Secretary Sanders said that his words were said in jest. You don’t joke by calling someone un-American and accusing them of treason. No, those words were designed to inflame, to damage the Democrats. I never dreamed that I would hear a President of the United States say something like that.

I felt moved to write to my Representative, Buddy Carter and my Senators Johnny Isaakson and David Perdue. I disagree with all three on many issues, but it would never occur to me call them un-American and treasonous. I’ve never heard a report of any of them calling those they disagree with the same. Here is what I wrote to them:

 

In his speech in Ohio yesterday, President Trump suggested – all but said – that members of Congress who disagreed with him and didn’t applaud him during his State of the Union Address were un-American and treasonous. I never dreamed that I would hear a President of the United States call dissenting politicians treasonous. You and I disagree on many things, but it has never crossed my mind to call you un-American or treasonous because of those differences. To do so would be contrary to our bedrock freedoms. I urge you, a Trump supporter, to impress upon President Trump how very wrong his statement was and how contrary to our core freedoms it was to call dissent and freedom of expression treason. In closing, I’ll leave you with these words from Edward R. Murrow:

“We must not confuse dissent with disloyalty.” – 9 March 1954, See it Now

 

After I emailed that note that closed with Murrow’s quotation, I felt the need to rewatch “Good Night and Good Luck,” the movie about Murrow taking on Joseph McCarthy. The closing of the See It Now episode which that quotation comes from never fails to cause a tear to come to my eye and even though we may not be facing McCarthyism today, we do face a toxic environment in which a President confuses dissent with disloyalty. I think that Murrow’s words of March 1954 mean just as much today as they did then:

 

No one familiar with the history of this country can deny that congressional committees are useful. It is necessary to investigate before legislating, but the line between investigating and persecuting is a very fine one and the junior Senator from Wisconsin has stepped over it repeatedly. His primary achievement has been in confusing the public mind, as between the internal and the external threats of Communism. We must not confuse dissent with disloyalty. We must remember always that accusation is not proof and that conviction depends upon evidence and due process of law. We will not walk in fear, one of another. We will not be driven by fear into an age of unreason, if we dig deep in our history and our doctrine, and remember that we are not descended from fearful men — not from men who feared to write, to speak, to associate and to defend causes that were, for the moment, unpopular.

This is no time for men who oppose Senator McCarthy’s methods to keep silent, or for those who approve. We can deny our heritage and our history, but we cannot escape responsibility for the result. There is no way for a citizen of a republic to abdicate his responsibilities. As a nation we have come into our full inheritance at a tender age. We proclaim ourselves, as indeed we are, the defenders of freedom, wherever it continues to exist in the world, but we cannot defend freedom abroad by deserting it at home.

The actions of the junior Senator from Wisconsin have caused alarm and dismay amongst our allies abroad, and given considerable comfort to our enemies. And whose fault is that? Not really his. He didn’t create this situation of fear; he merely exploited it — and rather successfully. Cassius was right. “The fault, dear Brutus, is not in our stars, but in ourselves.”

 

Observations on the Whistler TRX-1 Digital Trunking Scanner

A few weeks ago, I purchased a Whistler TRX-1 scanner after reading a review of it in Frequency Monitor magazine. I haven’t used a non-Uniden scanner in quite a long time and I wanted something that would receive NXDN since I find myself in the Pierce County and Bleckley County areas (both of which have transitioned to NXDN in recent years) so I decided to try out the TRX-1. First of all, it’s a rather hefty radio; even without the batteries in it, it feels heavier than either my BCD396XT or BCD436HP.  It uses four AA batteries instead three AA batteries like the 396 and 436 do and it’s worth mentioning now that it does not come with batteries in the box, you’ll have to have some on hand when you open the box if you plan on using it right away (they really should include a set of batteries in it, even if it’s just some regular old AAs). It’s about a third again the size of a Uniden BCD396XT, but a rubber case surrounds the actual radio adding some size to it. That rubber surround reminds me of a more wrap-around version of the rubber surround you could get for the old Yaesu FT-50 HTs and if you decide to carry it on your belt, it could really save some wear and tear on the radio.

 

The Whistler TRX-1 (center) flanked by the Uniden BCD396XT (left) and Uniden BCD436HP (right) for size and display comparison (disregard the talkgroup showing on the 396, the other two radios are set up to skip that talkgroup)

 

As far as accessories go, you’ll want to be careful when buying antennas, but you’re likely to already have at least one programming/charging cable for the TRX-1 lying around. The stock antenna on the TRX-1 is a bit stubby, but it does a decent job on VHF/UHF. As you’ll notice in the photo above, the TRX-1 bucks the trend in recent handheld scanners and amateur radio equipment by using a BNC connector rather than an SMA connector, so if you’re buying aftermarket antennas for the TRX-1, make sure you buy them with BNC connectors. If you plan on using antennas you already have that have SMA connectors, you’ll have to have some BNC to SMA adapters. If you already have other equipment that uses mini USB cables, you’re in luck. The TRX-1 uses a USB cable to both connect it to a computer for programming and to charge rechargeable batteries if you’re using them. A mini USB cable comes with the radio, but it never hurts to have spares.

 

Positives

It will receive NXDN transmissions. Commercially known as NEXEDGE, NXDN is a digital voice protocol developed by Kenwood and Icom. It’s said that railroad users will be transitioning to NXDN from analog FM and some public safety users are choosing it over P25, which sees more widespread use among public safety. That’s the primary reason I bought the TRX-1, to have an NXDN capable radio.

You don’t have to pay for an upgrade to do DMR like you have to with the Uniden BCD436HP, it does it out of the box. Based on listening I did in Laurens County with their DMR frequencies, the TRX-1 does a great job decoding the DMR, I experienced no problems with the audio even if I was inside of a building or in the car. I briefly tracked a DMR trunking system in Savannah with it and it tracked the system with no noticeable problems from inside the house with the stock antenna whereas it seemed to be too far away for the BCD436HP to track it (keep this in mind for later).

You have the option of skipping or receiving encrypted transmissions with the TRX-1. Being able to set the radio to not ignore encrypted transmissions is a great feature and one that Unidens don’t have. You can’t understand the encrypted transmissions, but there are times that knowing they’re being made is informative. One of the settings for encrypted transmissions is a telephone-like busy tone that the radio makes while an encrypted transmission is active. (I would definitely urge Uniden to adopt this feature on their next generation of scanners).

The TRX-1 allows you to review recorded transmissions instead of just listening to them. You can scroll through the recordings and listen to only ones you want to. It’s a much more useful and less time-consuming method than either the Uniden Home Patrol or BCD436HP use.

The aforementioned rubber case that comes with it is definitely positive point; as I mentioned above it really could prevent wear and tear on the radio if you wear it on your belt. It doesn’t protect the front from scratches, but it would definitely help prevent shock damage from drops. There are olive drab and gray swappable inserts for the back of the rubber case and a removable swivel belt clip that doesn’t come off easily; I like it a lot better than the belt clips that come with more recent Uniden handhelds.

 

The back of the TRX-1 showing the stout belt clip and one of the two decorative inserts that come with the rubber case that surrounds the radio (the other is olive drab).

 

Negatives

The battery life is short. I’ve found I only get about to four, maybe five hours at best from four rechargeable AAs from a full charge. This isn’t too good if you’re using it as a day-long event scanner. You’re going to be changing batteries more often and that involved taking it out of the rubber surround I mentioned above; it isn’t as easy as sliding a battery door off, taking out the old batteries and putting in some new ones. The TRX-1 charges through the same mini-USB port that it connects to your computer through (like the Uniden BCD436HP and Home Patrol 2 do), so I got around this issue while on vacation by carrying a USB battery in my pack and connecting it to the TRX-1 with the programming cable when it began getting low.

It has low audio, even with the audio boost feature turned on, it’s hard to get enough volume to hear in some situations. I can get higher volume out of both my BCD396XT and BCD436HP. If you’re going to be listening to the TRX-1 in a moderate noise environment or higher, headphones or earbuds will be a must.

The TRX-1’s display, even though it’s sizeable, doesn’t display as much information as the display on a Uniden BCD436HP does. It’s just a bit larger than the display on a BCD396XT and like the 396, alphanumeric tags for talkgroups and frequencies are more character limited. Also similar to the 396, the TRX-1’s display appears cramped and run-together. Personally, I prefer the 436’s display with longer alphanumeric tags and more space between fields and lines. For a radio as expensive as it is, I would expect a better, more readable display from the TRX-1.

The TRX-1’s user interface isn’t as user-friendly for me as the ones for my Unidens area. My biggest issue with the user interface is with manually tuning the radio for a channel (or object as the Whistler terms it). I have a habit of hearing something but by the time I grab the radio it’s scanned past what I want to hear. With the BCD396XT and BCD436HP that isn’t a problem, you can hold it on a frequency or talkgroup with the press of a button then scroll up or down through the menu to find the frequency or talkgroup you want to go back to. On the TRX-1, if it has already returned to scan you have to get out of scan mode, find what you want by selecting the object you want out of a menu and then selecting it to hold it on that object and listen. That’s terribly inconvenient and time-consuming. This probably isn’t an issue for many listeners, but I’m a bit of a different individual and it causes issues for me.

V-Scanner Folders in the TRX-1’s memory are similar but not quite the same as Favorites Lists in the Uniden BCD436HP’s and Home Patrol’s memories. One of the things I like about the 436 and the Home Patrol is the ability to monitor multiple Favorites Lists at one time; you can only scan one V-Scanner Folder at a time with the TRX-1. You can get a similar result by using Scan Sets with the TRX-1, but once again, it leads to a slightly more complicated way of getting the job done than the 436 (but not the Home Patrol does). With both the TRX-1 and Home Patrol, you just have to through too many menu screens to do it, whereas with the 436 it’s just a few button pushes.

As good as it does on DMR, the TRX-1 just doesn’t receive P25 trunking systems, particularly multi-site ones, as good as my Uniden gear does. When I first programmed it up and started trying to use it, I was stunned that it was missing a lot of transmissions compared to my BCD396XT, BCD436HP, and Home Patrol 2. At home in Savannah, I’m not very far from one of the SEGARRN tower sites and was missing at least 50% of what the BCD436HP was in a side-by-side comparison. It took much fiddling about with the data decoding threshold settings and setting the squelch very low for the radio stop missing transmissions. Even then it still misses some transmissions that the Unidens don’t. In my observation, the TRX-1 has to have a much stronger signal on the control channel than a Uniden does to adequately track a trunking system. I’ve also noticed that I have to have a better signal on the TRX-1 than I do on one of my Unidens to get good quality P25 audio from the TRX-1, particularly on 700/800 MHz. Even with a 700/800 MHz specific antenna on the TRX-1 and a stock antenna on the 396 or 436, the Unidens give better sounding P25 audio on 700/800 MHz trunking systems in lower signal environments.

 

Software/Computer Control

I have a couple more negative aspects to go over but they’re not so much as negatives about the radio as they are about the software and decisions Whistler has made regarding software. I’m a fan of Butel’s programming and computer control/logging software (I also use ProScan and ID Tracker). For every scanner I’ve bought in recent years, I’ve bought Butel’s software for it. I’ve found it easier to program the radios with Butel’s software instead of the manufacturer’s software (I’m not as big of a user of pre-loaded databases as I am my own information) and I love the capability that computer logging gives you when you’re searching for new things or trying to scan an event. Imagine my surprise when I went to Butel’s website (after I had already taken delivery of the radio) and finding this:

“Every day we get multiple requests for better programming software for the new Whistler scanners. Unfortunately Whistler has officially stated to us that they will not release programming protocols for third party software development. If you did not make a purchase yet we advise to look at Uniden’s offerings instead since they do support us and other 3rd party software development for their scanners. And don’t hesitate to send your complaints to info@whistergroup.com and tell them you bought a Uniden instead!”

I found this extremely disappointing, all the more so because of how user unfriendly Whistler’s EZ Scan software for programming and managing the TRX-1 is. The software simply isn’t intuitive for anyone who’s used to Windows-based software (which I would imagine are most users). It’s difficult to navigate around the data fields through using the tab key or arrow keys like you can in most Windows-based software, you have to use the mouse to select or move to each field instead. You can’t copy and paste settings or data fields. When you import from the RadioReference database with Butel’s software you can pick and choose agency/frequencies/talkgroups, but with EZ Scan, you don’t have quite as much versatility in what you import. Finally, there is the speed of the computer/radio interface. It’s slow. Startlingly slow in fact, the transfer speed between the computer is more like that of the previous generation Uniden BCD396XT rather than the current generation Uniden BCD436HP and Home Patrols. If Whistler isn’t going to put some more effort into the radio’s software, then give third-party companies like Butel or ProScan the ability to do so. Frankly, if I knew this before I bought the TRX-, I may very well have decided not to buy it.

 

Conclusion

The TRX-1 really is a radio that I wanted to love, but between the 700/800 MHz P25 trunk tracking issues and the third party software issue, I’m left lukewarm. I’ve not had the chance to try it on NXDN yet (when I went through Bleckley County recently, things were apparently quiet) and it does quite well on DMR, so if you’re in an area that primarily uses DMR or NXDN, this very well could be the radio for you (the only one right now for NXDN). On the other hand, if your area primarily uses P25 I would definitely consider a different radio, the TRX-1 simply doesn’t track multi-site 700/800 MHz trunking systems as well as other choices do. If you’ve got some cash to toss around, however, the TRX-1 would make a pretty good secondary radio, especially for searching. That said, there are certainly some lessons that Uniden could learn from Whistler, particularly the ability to select whether or not you want to skip encrypted transmissions and the way you review the TRX-1’s recordings.

In short, if you need DMR capability over P25 capability, go with a TRX-1. If you need P25 capability over DMR, go with a Uniden. For NXDN, at this time the TRX-1 is your only choice. The software issue is one that could be easily remedied by Whistler having a change of heart and sharing what’s needed for third parties to produce programming/control software for it.

Sentry Savannah Update; 2 February 2018

Savannah – After another day of monitoring the Sentry Savannah exercise and a ride out to the airport to watch the morning sorties recover, I have some updates on the frequencies and callsigns in use. 314.300 became an interesting frequency; on 31 January I thought the 159th FW F-15s were using it, but on 1 February, it was definitely being used by VFA-143 F/A-18Es. For now, I’m going to show it in use by both. Unfortunately, I’m not sure when I’ll have another opportunity to listen in so this may or may not be the last update on this Sentry Savannah. As always, if anyone has any additions or corrections, please let me know and I’ll add them to the list.

 

43rd FS F-22A on approach to Savannah-Hilton Head IAP

 

Frequencies
119.100/257.800 – Savannah IAP Tower
124.975/279.575 – Hunter AAF Tower
120.400/353.775 – Savannah Approach/Departure
125.300/371.875 – Savannah Approach/Departure
118.400/307.225 – Savannah Approach/Departure

269.550/124.700 – Jax Center Columbia Low
281.550 – Jax Center Georgetown High
282.200/124.675 – Jax Center Jekyll Low
282.300/135.975 – Jax Center Alma High
285.650/126.125 – Jax Center Statesboro High
363.200/132.925 – Jax Center Allendale/Savannah Low

120.950/284.500 – Sealord North Primary
133.950/267.500 – Sealord South Primary

288.400 – NORAD Discrete; Check-In
293.600 – NORAD Discrete; Blue Air
316.300 – NORAD Discrete; Red Air
265.400 – NORAD Discrete; Aerial Refueling
278.000 – Aerial Refueling

237.000 – ADC Ops; 43rd FS Ops
256.850 – 43rd FS Air-to-Air
288.900 – 43rd FS Air-to-Air
352.100 – 43rd FS Air-to-Air

290.000 – Old VMFA-251 Tac 1; 2nd FTS Ops
320.600 – 2nd FTS Air-to-Air

350.657 – North TACTS Range; VFA-143 Base
268.500 – VMFA-143 Tac
314.300 – VMFA-143 Tac
357.000 – VMFA-143 Tac

298.300 – 169th FW Ops
141.825 – 169th FW V14
140.125 – 169th FW V15

251.250 – 125th FW Ops
234.800 – 125th FW Aux 5
253.700 – 125th FW Aux 6

314.300 – 159th FW Air-to-Air

139.2125 ($293) – ADC; visiting unit aircraft maintenance/support
139.4125 ($293) – ADC; VFA-143 maintenance/support
141.6375 ($293) – ADC; 43rd FS maintenance/support
142.3625 ($293) – ADC; visiting unit aircraft maintenance/support

 

Callsigns
RAPTOR ## (F-22A, 43rd FS)
SAVAGE ## (F-22A, 43rd FS)
STINGER ## (F-22A, 43rd FS)

BEAGLE ## (T-38, 2nd FTS)
HOUND ## (T-38, 2nd FTS)

GRIFFIN ## (F/A-18E, VFA-143)
TAPROOM ## (F/A-18E, VFA-143)

MACE ## (F-16CM, 169th FW)

FANG ## (F-15C, 125th FW)
GATOR ## (F-15C, 125th FW)

JAZZ ## (F-15C, 159th FW)

DIXIE 10 (KC-135R, 63-8035, 117th ARW)
HUSKER 33 (KC-135R, 59-1495, 155th ARW)
SODA 55 (KC-135R, 59-1505, 134th ARW)

DOGHOUSE (325th FW Schoolhouse)
KREMLIN (Red Air GCA)
DRAGON (RTO)

Coastal Georgia Military Monitoring Recap; January 2018

January 2018 was a great month for military monitoring. Vacation time provided some extra radio time and trips to St. Augustine and Warner Robins that offered opportunities to monitor NAS Jacksonville, NS Mayport, Cecil Field, and Robins AFB more closely than normal. The MAG-31 MDTC that usually takes place at MCAS Beaufort during January and February brought some visiting units and increased activity to the area. Traditionally, late January/early February is also the time for Sentry Savannah exercises at the Georgia ANG Air Dominance Center at Savannah-Hilton Head IAP; this year is no different, visiting units began showing up and the first Sentry Savannah of 2018 started during the last week of the month. In addition to the MDTC and Sentry Savannah, January saw a number of aircraft from European air forces in the area: German Air Force Global 5000s, a Netherlands Air Force Gulfstream, and a UK Royal Air Force Atlas C1.

 

Hunter AAF
124.975 – Tower
279.575 – Tower
121.800 – Ground
291.675 – Ground
126.200 – Base Ops
285.425 – Base Ops
309.000 – PMSV
37.975 – 2-3 AVN “KNIGHTHAWK Ops”
38.150 – 1/169 AVN “HURRICANE Ops”
345.000 – USCG AirSta Savannah Ops
150.300 ($293) – CH 107, USCG AirSta Savannah Ops
157.175 – Marine VHF Ch 83, CGAS Savannah MX Control

ARMY 95601 (AH-64D, 09-05601, 3-17 CAV)
ARMY 20572 (UH-60M, 13-20572, 4-3 AVN)
ARMY 20585 (UH-60M, 13-20585, 4-3 AVN)
ARMY 20646 (UH-60M, 13-20646, 4-3 AVN)
ARMY 20653 (UH-60M, 14-20653, 4-3 AVN)
ARMY 03746 (MH-47G, 04-03746, 3-160 SOAR)
ARMY 03749 (MH-47G, 04-03749, 3-160 SOAR)
ARMY 03753 (MH-47G, 04-03753, 3-160 SOAR)
ARMY 03754 (MH-47G, 05-03754, 3-160 SOAR)
ARMY 03755 (MH-47G, 05-03755, 3-160 SOAR)
ARMY 03756 (MH-47G, 05-03756, 3-160 SOAR)
ARMY 03760 (MH-47G, 05-03760, 3-160 SOAR)
ARMY 20008 (MH-60M, 05-20008, 3-160 SOAR)
ARMY 20222 (MH-60M, 3-160 SOAR?)
RONIN 12 (MC-12S-2, 09-00642, 224th MI Bn)
SHADY 11 (MC-12S-2, 09-00642, 224th MI Bn)
SHADY 25 (MC-12S-2, 10-00742, 224th MI Bn)
SHADY 27 (MC-12S-2, 10-00742, 224 MI Bn)
SHADY 27 (MC-12S, 11-00268, 224th MI Bn)
SHADY 29 (MC-12S-2, 09-00642, 224th MI Bn)
SHADY 31 (MC-12S-2, 09-00642, 224th MI Bn)
SHADY 92 (MC-12S-2, 09-00642, 224th MI Bn)
GUARD 08076 (CH-47F, 10-08076, 1/169 AVN)
GUARD 08760 (CH-47F, 08-08760, 1/169 AVN)
HURRICANE ## (CH-47F, 1/169 AVN)
COAST GUARD 6526 (MH-65D, 6526, CGAS Savannah)
COAST GUARD 6531 (MH-65D, 6531, CGAS Savannah)
COAST GUARD 6544 (MH-65D, 6544, CGAS Savannah)
COAST GUARD 6547 (MH-65D, 6547, CGAS Savannah)
COAST GUARD 6567 (MH-65D, 6567, CGAS Savannah)
COAST GUARD 6566 (MH-65D, USCG)
COAST GUARD 6582 (MH-65D, 6582, CGAS Detroit)
GUARD 23490 (UH-60A, 80-23490, US Army)
GUARD 26169 (UH-60L)
HUSKER 33 (KC-135R, 59-1495, 155th ARW)
SODA 55 (KC-135R, 59-1505, 134th ARW)

 

RONIN12 (AE2F61) was a 224th MI Bn MC-12S-2 flying as RONIN 12 instead of the usual SHADY callsign on 25 January 2018, as it did on several occasions throughout the month

 

Savannah IAP/CRTC
119.100 – Tower
257.800 – Tower
121.900 – Ground
348.600 – Ground
120.400 – Approach/Departure
353.775 – Approach/Departure
125.300 – Approach/Departure
371.875 – Approach/Departure
118.400 – Approach/Departure
307.225 – Approach/Departure
123.025 – Savannah Helicopter Advisory
225.750 – 165th AW CP “ANIMAL CONTROL”
225.050 – 165th AW Air-to-Air
173.5625 – 165th AW MOC (NAC 302)
237.000 – ADC Ops; 43rd FS Ops
256.750 – 43rd FS Air-to-Air
288.900 – 43rd FS Air-to-Air
352.100 – 43rd FS Air-to-Air
290.000 – Old VMFA-251 Tac 1; 2nd FTS Ops
320.600 – 2nd FTS Air-to-Air
350.675 – North TACTS Range; VFA-143 Base
268.500 – VFA-143 Tac
314.300 – 159th FW Air-to-Air
123.200 – WCM9, Gulfstream Aerospace
128.925 – Gulfstream Service Center
130.375 – Signature Flight Support

DAWG 10 (C-130H3, 94-6707, 165th AW)
DAWG 10 flight (2x C-130H, 165th AW)
DAWG 61 (C-130H3, 93-1561, 165th AW)
JILL 11 (C-130H3, 94-6707, 165th AW)
REACH 840 (C-130H3, 94-6705, 165th AW)
EAGLE ## (MD-500, Chatham Co)
GULFTEST 06 (G500, N502GS, Gulfstream Aerospace)
GULFTEST 10 (G600, N730GD, Gulfstream Aerospace)
GULFTEST 11 (G500, N503G, Gulfstream Aerospace)
GULFTEST 11 (G600, N601GA, Gulfstream Aerospace)
GULFTEST 14 (G650, N287GA, Gulfstream Aerospace)
GULFTEST 14 (G650, N289GA or N778AR, Gulfstream Aerospace)
GULFTEST 14 (G650, N650GX, Gulfstream Aerospace)
GULFTEST 20 (G600, N740GD, Gulfstream Aerospace)
GULFTEST 33 (G650, N310GA, Gulfstream Aerospace)
GULFTEST 33 (G650, N650GX, Gulfstream Aerospace)
GULFTEST 35 (G650, N294GA, Gulfstream Aerospace)
GULFTEST 35 (G500, N500GA, Gulfstream Aerospace)
GULFTEST 41 (G450, N312GA, Gulfstream Aerospace)
GULFTEST 44 (G650, N650GX, Gulfstream Aerospace)
GULFTEST 45 (G550, N989AR, WFBN/Matone Promotora)
GULFTEST 46 (G650, N283GA, Gulfstream Aerospace)
GULFTEST 47 (G650, N650GX, Gulfstream Aerospace)
GULFTEST 50 (G650, N611GA, Gulfstream Aerospace)
GULFTEST 51 (G500, N504GS, Gulfstream Aerospace)
GULFTEST 52 (G500, N504GS, Gulfstream Aerospace)
GULFTEST 52 (G600, N601GA, Gulfstream Aerospace)
GULFTEST 55 (G550, N550PR, Prem Rawat-Priyan Foundation)
GULFTEST 58 (G500, N504GS, Gulfstream Aerospace)
GULFTEST 61 (G650, N611GA, Gulfstream Aerospace)
GULFTEST 62 (G550, N527GA, Gulfstream Aerospace)
GULFTEST 62 (G450, N899FS, Bank of Utah Trustee)
GULFTEST 64 (G650, N289GA, Gulfstream Aerospace)
GULFTEST 64 (G650, N291GA, Gulfstream Aerospace)
GULFTEST 66 (GV-SP, N56UH, United Healthcare Services)
GULFTEST 67 (G600, N601GA, Gulfstream Aerospace)
GULFTEST 69 (Gulfstream Test Flight)
GULFTEST 75 (G500, N500GA, Gulfstream Aerospace)
GULFTEST 76 (G500, N502GS, Gulfstream Aerospace)
GULFTEST 76 (G600, N601GA, Gulfstream Aerospace)
GULFTEST 83 (G600, N740GD, Gulfstream Aerospace)
GULFTEST 88 (G650, N310GA, Gulfstream Aerospace)
GULFTEST 89 (G500, N504GS, Gulfstream Aerospace)
GULFTEST 89 (G650, N650GX, Gulfstream Aerospace)
GULFTEST 90 (G550, N571GA, Gulfstream Aerospace)
GULFTEST 92 (G500, N500GA, Gulfstream Aerospace)
GULFTEST 92 (G650, N650GX, Gulfstream Aerospace)
GULFTEST 93 (G500, N500GA, Gulfstream Aerospace)
RAPTOR ## (F-22A, 43rd FS)
SAVAGE ## (F-22A, 43rd FS)
STINGER ## (F-22A, 43rd FS)
BEAGLE ## (T-38, 2nd FTS)
HOUND ## (T-38, 2nd FTS)
GRIFFIN ## (F/A-18E, VFA-143)
TAPROOM ## (F/A-18E, VFA-143)
FANG ## (F-15C, 125th FW)
JAZZ ## (F-15C, 159th FW)
BISON 01 (T-38, Tyndall AFB)
CAP 938 (C182, N639CP, GA Civil Air Patrol)
COAST GUARD 101 (C-37A, 01, CGAS Washington)

Sentry Savannah
288.400 – NORAD Discrete; Check In
293.600 – NORAD Discrete; Blue Air
316.300 – NORAD Discrete; Red Air
265.400 – NORAD Discrete; Aerial Refueling
278.000 – Aerial Refueling

Fort Stewart/Wright AAF
127.350 – Marne Radio
279.625 – Marne Radio
126.250 – Wright AAF Tower
269.275 – Wright AAF Tower
48.500 – Fort Stewart Range Control

Brunswick/Golden Isles Airport
123.000 – CTAF

OMEGA 71 (707, N707MQ, Omega Air)

Malcolm McKinnon Airport/Jekyll Island Airport
123.050 – CTAF

Plantation Air Park, Sylvania, GA
122.800 – CTAF

Statesboro-Bulloch County Airport
122.800 – CTAF

JUMPER 2 (C182, The Jumping Place)

Hilton Head Airport
118.975 – Tower

MCAS Beaufort
119.050 – Tower
342.875 – Tower
269.125 – Approach/Departure
123.700 – Approach/Departure
292.125 – Approach/Departure
125.125 – Approach/Departure
281.800 – Base Ops
264.500 – PMSV
238.400 – VMFA-115 Base
339.500 – VMFA-115 Tac 1
225.675 – VMFA-115 Tac 2, also used by VMFA-112
274.500 – VMFA-115 Tac 3, in use by VMFA-112
305.800 – VMFA(AW)-224 Base
228.300 – VMFA(AW)-224 Tac 1
258.900 – VMFA(AW)-224 Tac 2
310.200 – VMFA(AW)-533 Base
289.275 – VMFA(AW)-533 Tac 1
299.300 – VMFA(AW)-533 Tac 2
343.200 – VMFAT-501 Base
326.700 – VMFAT-501 Tac 1
349.225 – VMFAT-501 Tac 2
341.825 – VMFAT-501 Tac 3
318.300 – MAG-31 MDTC “KAISER Base”
251.400 – MAG-31 MDTC Air-to-Air
258.900 – MAG-31 MDTC Air-to-Air
290.000 – MAG-31 MDTC Air-to-Air
327.475 – MAG-31 MDTC Air-to-Air
376.425 – MAG-31 MDTC Air-to-Air
361.800 – VMFA-112 Air-to-Air (old VMFA-115 Base)
268.300 – VMFT-401 Tac
285.375 – VMFT-401 Tac
300.550 – VMFT-401 Tac
136.875 – ATAC Air-to-Air

BLADE 2# (F/A-18A+, VMFA-115)
BENGAL 4# (F/A-18D, VMFA-224)
HAWK 8#, 9# (F/A-18D, VMFA-533)
SWEDE ## (F-35B, VMFAT-501)
KHAKI ## (F/A-18, MAG-31 MDTC)
LATCH ## (F/A-18, MAG-31 MDTC)
SALEM ## (F/A-18, MAG-31 MDTC)
FOX 103 (UC-12M, 163836, MCAS Beaufort)
FOX 123 (UC-12M, 163840, MCAS Beaufort)
FOX 466 (UC-12M, 163840, MCAS Beaufort)
FOX 836 (UC-12M, 163836, MCAS Beaufort)
FOX 840 (UC-12M, 163840, MCAS Beaufort)
ASCOT 4569 (C1, ZM409, Royal Air Force 70 Sqn)
BANDIT (F-5N, VFC-111)
COWBOY ## (F/A-18A+, VMFA-112)
SNIPER ## (F-5N, VMFT-401)
ATAC 2# (F21 Kfir, ATAC)

 

RRR4569 (43C5E3) was Royal Air Force 70 Sqn Atlas C1 ZM409 flying as ASCOT 4569 en route to MCAS Beaufort, SC on 24 January 2018

 

Jacksonville IAP
118.000 – Approach/Departure
121.300 – Approach/Departure
123.800 – Approach/Departure
124.900 – Approach/Departure
127.000 – Approach/Departure
322.400 – Approach/Departure
335.600 – Approach/Departure
351.800 – Approach/Departure
377.050 – Approach/Departure
118.300 – Jacksonville IAP Tower
317.700 – Jacksonville IAP Tower
251.250 – 125th FW Maintenance/Ops
273.900 – 125th FW SOF
234.800 – 125th FW Aux 5
253.700 – 125th FW Aux 6
314.200 – 125th FW Aux 7
343.000 – 125th FW Aux 8

FANG 0# (F-15C, 125th FW)
GATOR 0# (F-15C, 125th FW)
JAGS 0# (F-15C, 125th FW)

NAS Jacksonville/Mayport NS/Cecil Field
118.000 – Approach/Departure
121.300 – Approach/Departure
123.800 – Approach/Departure
124.900 – Approach/Departure
127.000 – Approach/Departure
322.400 – Approach/Departure
335.600 – Approach/Departure
351.800 – Approach/Departure
377.050 – Approach/Departure
125.150 – NAS Jacksonville Tower
340.200 – NAS Jacksonville Tower
239.300 – NS Mayport Tower
126.100 – Cecil Field Tower
134.775 – NAS Jacksonville Base Ops
310.200 – NAS Jacksonville Base Ops
263.500 – HSM-72 Base
357.000 – HSM-72 Air-to-Air
264.200 – VP-26/45 Base
271.400 – VP-16 Base
306.000 – VP-30 Base
246.900 – P-8A Air-to-Air
361.300 – VR-58/VR-62 Base
264.350 – HSM-46 Base
299.750 – HSM-48 Base

NAVY HK 44 (MH-60R, HSM-40)
NAVY 605 (MH-60R, HSM-60)
SPARTAN 711 (MH-60R, HSM-70)
BIG CHIEF 70# (MH-60R, HSM-72)
WARRIOR 70# (MH-60R, HSM-72)
GRIFFIN 22 (P-8A, 168434, VP-45/CPRW-11)
LANCER 01 (P-8A, 168763, VP-10)
LANCER 22 (P-8A, 168431, VP-10)
LANCER 22 (P-8A, 168440, VP-10)
LANCER 24 (P-8A, 168431, VP-10)
LANCER 27 (P-8A, 168763, VP-10)
LANCER 55 (P-8A, 168763, VP-10)
LANCER 56 (P-8A, 168431, VP-10)
LANCER 61 (P-8A, 168431, VP-10)
LANCER 88 (P-8A, 168763, VP-10)
TALON 02 (P-8A, 168428, VP-16)
TALON 02 (P-8A, 168860, VP-16)
TALON 07 (P-8A, 168428, VP-16)
TALON 12 (P-8A, 168428, VP-16)
TALON 19 (P-8A, 168853, VP-16)
TALON 49 (P-8A, 168428, VP-16)
TALON 75 (P-8A, 168428, VP-16)
TALON 85 (P-8A, VP-16)
TALON 87 (P-8A, 168853 VP-16)
TALON 90 (P-8A, 168428, VP-16)
TRIDENT 02 (P-8A, 168848, VP-26)
TRIDENT 12 (P-8A, 169332, VP-26)
TRIDENT 15 (P-8A, 169332, VP-26)
TRIDENT 22 (P-8A, 168430, VP-26)
TRIDENT 33 (P-8A, 168848, VP-26)
TRIDENT 33 (P-8A, 169332, VP-26)
TRIDENT 34 (P-8A, 168851, VP-26)
TRIDENT 34 (P-8A, 169332, VP-26)
TRIDENT 57 (P-8A, 168430, VP-26)
NAVY LL 52 (P-3C, 160293, VP-30)
NAVY LL 800 (P-8A, 168435, VP-30)
NAVY LL 800 (P-8A, 169330, VP-30)
NAVY LL 801 (P-8A, 168856, VP-30)
NAVY LL 803 (P-8A, 168329, VP-30)
NAVY LL 803 (P-8A, 169334, VP-30)
NAVY LL 808 (P-8A, 169326, VP-30)
NAVY LL 811 (P-8A, 169326, VP-30)
NAVY LL 812 (P-8A, 169330, VP-30)
NAVY LL 813 (P-8A, 169328, VP-30)
NAVY LL 814 (P-8A, 169334, VP-30)
NAVY LL 818 (P-8A, 168856, VP-30)
NAVY LL 822 (P-8A, 169329, VP-30)
NAVY LL 822 (P-8A, 169330, VP-30)
NAVY LL 829 (P-8A, 169326, VP-30)
NAVY LL 829 (P-8A, 168329, VP-30)
NAVY LL 833 (P-8A, 169326, VP-30)
NAVY LL 854 (P-8A, 168852, VP-30)
NAVY LL 858 (P-8A, 168852, VP-30)
NAVY LL 860 (P-8A, 168329, VP-30)
NAVY LL 869 (P-8A, 169326, VP-30)
NAVY LL 869 (P-8A, 169334, VP-30)
NAVY LL 871 (P-8A, 169001, VP-30)
NAVY LL 878 (P-8A, 169002, VP-30)
NAVY LL 891 (P-8A, 169330, VP-30)
NAVY LL 895 (P-8A, 169328, VP-30)
NAVY LL 897 (P-8A, 168856, VP-30)
NAVY LL 897 (P-8A, 169334, VP-30)
PELICAN 02 (P-8A, 168434, VP-45)
PELICAN 02 (P-8A, 169000, VP-45)
PELICAN 03 (P-8A, 169006, VP-45)
PELICAN 07 (P-8A, VP-45)
PELICAN 11 (P-8A, 169000, VP-45)
PELICAN 13 (P-8A, VP-45)
PELICAN 18 (P-8A, 169006, VP-45)
PELICAN 21 (P-8A, 168756, VP-45)
PELICAN 32 (P-8A, 168762, VP-45)
PELICAN 45 (P-8A, 168756, VP-45)
PELICAN 57 (P-8A, 168440, VP-45)
PELICAN 77 (P-8A, 168434, VP-45)
PELICAN 77 (P-8A, 168761, VP-45)
PELICAN 91 (P-8A, 169000, VP-45)
NAVY LT 621 (P-3C, 161415, VP-62)
CONVOY 4435 (C-40A, 168980, VR-58)
CUTLASS 473 (MH-60R, HSL-46)
NAVY HR 510 (MH-60R, HSM-48)
VENOM 506 (MH-60R, HSM-48)
JAGUAR 604 (MH-60R, HSM-60)

Northeast Florida Regional (St Augustine)
127.625 – Tower
269.475 – Tower
123.200 – Grumman “ECHO Base”
275.200 – Grumman “ECHO Base”

GRUMMAN 21 (unknown)

Charleston AFB
120.700 – Charleston App/Dep
135.800 – Charleston App/Dep
306.925 – Charleston App/Dep
379.925 – Charleston App/Dep
134.100 – Charleston AFB “PALMETTO Ops”
349.400 – Charleston AFB “PALMETTO Ops”
235.775 – North Field CCT
314.450 – 437th/315th AW Air-to-Air

MOOSE ## (C-17A, 437th/315th AW)
VOLT 43 (C-17A, 00-0172, 437th/315th AMW)
EAGLE 77 (C-17A, 09-9207, 15th AS)
PELICAN ## (C-17A, 14th AS)
TURTLE ## (C-17A, 701st AS)
REACH 525 (C-17A, 02-1099, 437th/315th)
SPAR 470 (C-21A, 84-0120, 375th AW)
BOEING 001 (B787, N528ZC, Boeing Company)
BOEING 816 (787, Boeing Charleston Test)

 

EAGLE77 (AE49C3) was 15th AS C-17A 09-9207 flying as EAGLE 77 on 23 January 2018; this catch is a bit unusual in that the C-17 was sending ADS-B, which they usually don’t do

 

Shaw AFB
125.400 – Columbia App/Dep
318.100 – Columbia App/Dep
311.200 – 55th FS “SHOOTER Ops”
141.675 – 55th FS Air-to-Air
141.775 – 55th FS Air-to-Air
141.900 – 55th FS Air-to-Air
320.525 – 79th FS “TIGER Ops”
138.150 – 79th FS Air-to-Air
141.150 – 79th FS Air-to-Air
141.625 – 79th FS Air-to-Air
143.200 – 79th FS Air-to-Air

TABOR ## (F-16CM, 20th FW)
BRONCO ## (F-16CM, 55th FS)
FALCON ## (F-16CM, 55th FS)
SHAMROCK ## (F-16CM, 55th FS)
FALCON ## (F-16CM, 79th FS)
MADCAT ## (F-16CM, 79th FS)
SLASH ## (F-16CM, 79th FS)
STORMY ## (F-16CM, 79th FS)
TIGER ## (F-16CM, 79th FS)
TOPCAT ## (F-16CM, 79th FS)
UNRULY ## (F-16CM, 79th FS)
VOODOO ## (F-16CM, 79th FS)

McEntire ANGB
125.400 – Columbia App/Dep
318.100 – Columbia App/Dep
298.300 – 169th FW “SWAMP FOX Ops”
141.825 – 169th FW V14
140.125 – 169th FW V15
143.250 – 169th FW V16
225.700 – 169th FW Air-to-Air
363.775 – 169th FW Air-to-Air

MACE ## (F-16CM, 169th FW)
VIPER ## (F-16CM, 169th FW)
DEMON ## (F-16CM, 169th FW)

Robins AFB
133.225 – Robins AFB Tower
293.525 – 116th/461st ACW “PEACHTREE OPS”
324.650 – JSTARS Discrete
346.675 – JSTARS Discrete
367.275 – JSTARS Discrete
372.150 – JSTARS Discrete

KOMODO 06 (E-8C, 116th/461st ACW)
PEACH 99 (E-8C, 330th CTS)
NIGHTSTAR (E-8C backend, 12th ACCS)
STARGATE (E-8C backend, 330th CTS)
ORDER 66 (E-4B, 73-1676, 55th Wing)
N8454A (PA-28, Robins AFB Aero Club)

Moody AFB
143.150 – 23rd FG Air-to-Air

ZOMBIE ## (A-10C, 23rd FG)
KING 15 (HC-130J, 12-5768, 71st RQS)

Ranges/Military Operating Areas
228.400 – Townsend Range/Coastal MOA
252.900 – Townsend Range/Coastal MOA
343.750 – Bulldog MOA
354.300 – BEEFEATER ECM Range
289.200 – Pinecastle Range Ops
225.350 – Pinecastle Range Target

SEALORD (USN FACSFAC Jax)
120.950 – North Primary
133.950 – South Primary
284.500 – North Primary
267.500 – South Primary
313.700 – North Secondary
349.800 – W-137 Discrete
376.900 – W-137 Discrete
385.300 – W-137 Discrete
318.600 – SEALORD Discrete
339.700 – SEALORD Discrete
320.500 – BRISTOL Discrete

Doubleshot (W-161/177)
127.725 – DOUBLESHOT Primary
228.275 – DOUBLESHOT Primary
258.400 – W-161/177 Discrete
279.725 – W-161/177 Discrete

Miscellaneous
364.200 – NORAD AICC
293.600 – NORAD Discrete
316.300 – NORAD Discrete
327.600 – AR-202
324.600 – AR-207
311.000 – MacDill AFB “LIGHTNING Ops”
292.100 – 6th AMW/927th ARW Air-to-Air
349.400 – Patrick AFB “BARRIER Ops”
301.125 – 4th FW Air-to-Air

AEGIS 71 (C-130J, 11-57400, 19th AW)
AMBUSH 22 (MC-12S-2, 08-0376, 305th MI Bn)
ARMY 0154 (C-12T, 84-00154, LA ARNG)
BACKY 32 (KC-135R, 62-3509, 916th ARW)
BACKY 33 (KC-135R, 62-3528, 916th ARW)
BANDSAW (E-3, 964th ACCS)
BISON 33 (KC-135R, 58-0038, 914th ARW)
BISON 81 (KC-135R, 58-0038, 914th ARW)
BOLT 02 (KC-135R, 6th AMW/927th ARW)
CLAW 23 (C-17A, 02-1098, 305th AMW)
COAST GUARD 202 (C-37A, 202, US Coast Guard)
COAST GUARD 1704 (HC-130H, 1704, CGAS Clearwater)
COAST GUARD 2007 (HC-130J, 2007, CGAS Elizabeth City)
COAST GUARD 2303 (HC-144A, 2303, CGAS Cape Cod)
COHO 75 (C-17A, 62nd AW)
CONGO 11 (T-1A, 451st FTS)
CONVOY 4376 (C-40A, 166694, VR-56)
CONVOY 4954 (C-40A, 166694, VR-56)
DINGO 82 (C-146A, 97-3093, 27th SOW)
EDDIE 61 (KC-135R, 58-0083, 151st ARW)
EDDIE 61 (KC-135R, 59-1444, 151st ARW)
EDDIE 62 (KC-135R, 61-0264, 151st ARW)
ENERGY 51 (unknown Dept of Energy)
EXECUTIVE 1F (C-32A, 99-0004, 89th AW)
FLIGHT CHECK 55 (LJ60, N55, FAA)
FLIGHT CHECK 69 (BE30, N69, FAA)
GERMAN AIR FORCE 685 (GL5T, 14+03, German AF FBS BMVg)
GERMAN AIR FORCE 689 (GL5T, 14+02, German AF FBS BMVg)
GOLDEN KNIGHT 262 (UV-18C, 10-80262, US Army Golden Knights)
GOLDEN KNIGHT 263 (UV-18C, 08-00263, US Army Golden Knights)
GOLDEN KNIGHT 608 (C-31A, 85-1608, US Army Golden Knights)
GREYHAWK 36 (C-2 or E-2, VAW-120)
GUARD 26600 (UH-60L, 95-26600, 1-171 AVN)
KBAR 561 (UC-12F, 163561, MCAS New River)
LOBO 462 (UC-35D, 166474, VMR-1)
LOBO 474 (UC-35D, 166474, VMR-1)
LOBO 543 (UC-35D, 166715, VMR-1)
LOBO 715 (UC-35D, 166715, VMR-1)
MARINE 374 (UC-35D, 166374, VMR Det – KADW)
MARINE 767 (UC-35D, 166767, MAW-4)
MOHAWK 99 (C-12U, 84-24379, A/2-228 AVN)
MOTOWN 02 (KC-135T, 60-0346, 127th Wing)
MOTOWN 03 (KC-135T, 58-0062, 127th Wing)
NAVY 101 (C-37B, 166377, VR-1)
NAVY AC 701 (MH-60S, HSC-7)
NETHERLANDS AIR FORCE 11 (G-IV, V-11, Netherlands Air Force)
NOAA 42 (WP-3D, N42RF, NOAA)
PAT 002 (C-12V, 94-00325, WA ARNG)
PAT 142 (C-12V, 94-00325, WA ARNG)
PAT 254 (C-12, US Army)
PAT 322 (C-12V, 94-00322, OSACOM)
PAT 501 (UC-35C, 03-00726, 2-228th AVN)
PAT 581 (C-12U, 84-24375, C/2-228 AVN)
PAT 726 (C-12, US Army)
PAT 744A (C-12T, 86-00088, FL ARNG)
PHOENIX 01 (unknown, Phoenix Air Group?)
PHOENIX 02 (unknown, Phoenix Air Group?)
PHOENIX 13 (unknown, Phoenix Air Group?)
PIONEER 40 (P-8A, 167955, VX-1)
PIRAT 24 (KC-135T, 58-0046, 6th AMW/927th ARW)
PIRAT 26 (KC-135R, 57-1439, 6th/927th AMW)
PIRAT 27 (KC-135R, 60-0335, 6th/927th AMW)
PIRAT 32 (KC-135R, 60-0335, 6th/927th AMW)
PIRAT 36 flight (KC-135R, 60-0353/63-8027, 6th AMW/927th ARW)
PITT 85 (C-130H, 87-9285, 914th AW)
QUID 95 (KC-135R, 61-0288, 100th ARW)
REACH 132T (C-17A, 06-6155, 60th AMW)
REACH 150 (C-17A, 06-6154, 60h AMW)
REACH 150 (C-17A, 07-7174, 436th AW)
REACH 286 (C-130J, 08-5726, 317th AG)
REACH 291 (C-17A, 96-0005, 105th AW)
REACH 347 (C-130J, 02-8155, 403rd AW)
REACH A612 (C-130J, 06-4631, 19th AW)
REACH A612 (C-130J, 07-3170, 317th AW)
REACH A612 (C-130J, 08-5705, 317th AG)
REACH A612 (C-130J, 11-5740, 19th AW)
REACH A612 (C-130J, 11-5752, 19th AW)
RED DOG 2# flight (H-1, HMLA-773)
SCORE 21 (P-8A, VX-20)
SCORE 27 (C-38A, 415700, VX-20)
SCREWTOP 33 (E-2C, VAW-123)
SENTRY 51 (E-3B, 73-1675, 965th ACCS)
SHOOTER 072 (T-6B, 166072, VT-6)
SIEGE ## (F-15E, 4th FW)
SPAR 358 (C-21A, 84-0137, 375th AW)
THUMPER (E-3C, 77-0353, 552nd ACW)
VALOR 06 (T-6A, 00-3588, 14th FTW)
VALOR 23 (T-6A, 98-3038, 14th FTW)
VALOR 25 (T-6A, 02-3651, 14th FTW)
VALOR 36 (T-6A, 02-3648, 14th FTW)
VALOR 82 (T-6A, 99-3555, 14th FTW)
VALOR 86 (T-6A, 05-3787, 14th FTW)
VIKING 99 (AE0442 – CN-235, 96-6044, 427th SOS)
YAHOO 70 (C-32B, 02-4452, 150th SOS)
N8NR (Bell 407, N8NR, Georgia DNR)
LIFESTAR 1 (Bell 407GX, N208AM, Air Methods)
N239AE (Bell 206L-1, AirEvac 96 Jesup)
N269AE (Bell 206L-3, AirEvac 91 Vidalia)
N296AE (Bell 206L-1, AirEvac 95 Statesboro)
N395AE (206L-1, AirEvac 102, Dublin)
N409AE (Bell 206L-4, AirEvac 90 Douglas)
N41299 (AS350, Air Methods LifeNet 4)

ARTCC
323.300/133.700 – Jax Center Baxley Low
254.325/125.375 – Jax Center Taylor Low
269.250/133.325 – Jax Center Ocala Low
269.550/124.700 – Jax Center Columbia Low
277.400/126.750 – Jax Center Brunswick Low
281.550 – Jax Center Georgetown High
282.200/124.675 – Jax Center Jekyll Low
282.300/135.975 – Jax Center Alma High
285.650/126.125 – Jax Center Statesboro High
290.350/132.425 – Jax Center Hunter Ultra High
290.400/132.300 – Jax Center Waycross Low
307.250/126.350 – Jax Center St. Augustine High
317.600/135.750 – Jax Center Cedar Key Low
319.200/127.875 – Jax Center Aiken High
351.700/124.075 – Jax Center Summerville High
363.200/132.925 – Jax Center Millen Low
379.100/127.950 – Jax Center Charleston Low
135.050 – Jax Center Meta Low/High

273.600/123.950 – Atlanta Center Macon Low
290.375/125.825 – Atlanta Center Macon Ultra High
307.050/126.425 – Atlanta Center Dublin High
322.325/128.100 – Atlanta Center Augusta Low

255.400/123.650 – FSS

USCG
156.8000 – Marine VHF Ch. 16
157.0500 – Marine VHF Ch. 21; Sector Charleston/Station Tybee
157.1000 – Marine VHF Ch. 22
162.3250 – USCG Net 111 (NAC 293); Sector Jacksonville
163.1375 – USCG Net 113 (NAC 293); Station Tybee
164.9000 – USCG Net 118 (NAC 293); Station Brunswick
412.9750 – USCG Net 409 (NAC 293); Sector Jacksonville
413.0000 – USCG Net 410 (NAC 293); Sector Charleston

Coastal Georgia Mode-S Log; January 2018

Mode-S hits from Military, Government, and Public Safety related aircraft as well as various other aircraft that catch my attention from attended monitoring of my RadarBox in Savannah and RadarBox Micro in Brunswick, GA. This month also includes some Mode-S hits from a few days spent in the St. Augustine, FL area.  Some interesting Mode-S hits for January include a Google Loon high altitude balloon, an RAF Atlas C1 going into MCAS Beaufort, and an American Airlines flight that had to return to Charlotte while over the Savannah area due to fumes in the cockpit.

 

HBAL046 (A20D33) was a Google Loon balloon that spent the morning of 25 January 2018 drifting across the Savannah area then over the Atlantic Ocean at 63,700 ft

 

RRR4569 (43C5E3) was a Royal Air Force 70 Sqn Atlas C1 ZM409 flying as ASCOT 4569 en route to MCAS Beaufort, SC on 24 January 2018

 

AAL1965 (A2DCEE) was an American Airlines flight over the Savannah area on 31 Janaury 2018, they advised Jax Center that they had fumes in the cabin and turned around near Brunswick to return to Charlotte, NC

 

3F4E27 – GL5T, 14+02, German AF FBS BMVg (GAF689)
3F6533 – GL5T, 14+03, German AF FBS BMVg (GAF685)
43C5E3 – C1, ZM409, 70 Sqn (RRR4569)
480C1A – G-IV, V-11, Netherlands Air Force (NAF 11)
7812BE – B787, Boeing Charleston Test Flight (BOE816)
A1AFC7 – Bell 407GX, N208AM, Air Methods (N208AM on box, LIFESTAR 1 on ATC)
A1ED66 – A320, N223NV, Allegiant Air (8028)
A20D33 – High Altitude Balloon, Google Loon (HBAL046) (63,800 ft)
A20D77 – A320, N231NV, Allegiant Air (8031)
A229F4 – Bell 206L-1, N239AE, AirEvac 96 Jesup (N239AE)
A2579E – C-146A, 16-3025/N250BG, 27th SOW/Sierra Nevada Corp (RABID68)
A2A071 – Bell 206L-3, N269AE, AirEvac 91 Vidalia (N269AE)
A2D9B7 – G650, N283GA, Gulfstream Aerospace (GLF46)
A2D9B7 – G650, N283GA, Gulfstream Aerospace (GULFTEST 46 on ATC)
A2DCEE – A320, N284AY, American Airlines (AAL1965)
A2E893 – G650, N287GA, Gulfstream Aerospace (GLF14)
A2F001 – G650, N289GA, Gulfstream Aerospace (GLF64)
A2F001 – G650, N289GA, Gulfstream Aerospace (GLF65)
A2F9C8 – G650, N291GA, Gulfstream Aerospace (GLF64)
A304ED – G650, N294GA, Gulfstream Aerospace (GLF35)
A30BC9 – Bell 206L-1, N296AE, AirEvac 95 Statesboro (N296AE)
A34768 – G650, N310GA, Gulfstream Aerospace (GLF33)
A34768 – G650, N310GA, Gulfstream Aerospace (GLF88)
A34ED6 – G450, N312GA, Gulfstream Aerospace (GLF41)
A49561 – Bell 206L-1, N395AE, AirEvac 102 Dublin (N395AE)
A4CE15 – Bell 206L-4, N409AE, AirEvac 90 Douglas
A4DF43 – AS350, N41299, Air Methods LifeNet 4
A4E7F3 – MD83, N451NV, Allegiant Air (ALLEGIANT 8034 on ATC)
A4F318 – MD83, N418NV, Allegiant Air (ALLEGIANT 8037 on ATC)
A4FAC3 – WP-3D, N42RF, NOAA (NOAA42)
A63A87 – G500, N500GA, Gulfstream Aerospace (GLF35)
A63A87 – G500, N500GA, Gulfstream Aerospace (GLF75)
A63A87 – G500, N500GA, Gulfstream Aerospace (GLF92)
A63A87 – G500, N500GA, Gulfstream Aerospace (GLF93)
A64205 – G500, N502GS, Gulfstream Aerospace (GLF58 on box, GULFTEST 76 on ATC)
A64205 – G500, N502GS, Gulfstream Aerospace (GLF6)
A64205 – G500, N502GS, Gulfstream Aerospace (GLF76)
A645AB – G500, N503G, Gulfstream Aerospace (GLF11)
A645AB – G500, N503G, Gulfstream Aerospace (GLF40)
A64973 – G500, N504GS, Gulfstream Aerospace (GLF51)
A64973 – G500, N504GS, Gulfstream Aerospace (GLF52)
A64973 – G500, N504GS, Gulfstream Aerospace (GLF58)
A64973 – G500, N504GS, Gulfstream Aerospace (GLF89)
A64D1D – G500, N505GD, Gulfstream Aerospace (N505GD)
A6A8E8 – B787, N528ZC, Boeing Company (BOE001)
A6EAE9 – C-146A, 97-3093, 27th SOW (DINGO82)
A6FD11 – LJ60, N55, FAA (FLC55)
A700C0 – G550, N550PR, Prem Rawat-Priyan Foundation (GLF55)
A7265B – GV-SP, N56UH, United Healthcare Services (GLF66)
A752B7 – G550, N571GA, Gulfstream Aerospace (GLF90)
A7566E – G550, N527GA, Gulfstream Aerospace (GLF62)
A768D4 – C-146A, 10-3077, 27th SOW
A7C7D5 – G600, N600G, Gulfstream Aerospace (N600G)
A7CB8D – G600, N601GA, Gulfstream Aerospace (GLF11)
A7CB8D – G600, N601GA, Gulfstream Aerospace (GLF52)
A7CB8D – G600, N601GA, Gulfstream Aerospace (GLF67)
A7CB8D – G600, N601GA, Gulfstream Aerospace (GLF76)
A7F30C – G650, N611GA, Gulfstream Aerospace (GLF62)
A7F30C – G650, N611GA, Gulfstream Aerospace (GULFTEST 50 on ATC)
A85F6B – C182, N639CP, GA Civil Air Patrol
A88D66 – G650, N650GX, Gulfstream Aerospace (GLF14)
A88D66 – G650, N650GX, Gulfstream Aerospace (GLF33)
A88D66 – G650, N650GX, Gulfstream Aerospace (GLF44)
A88D66 – G650, N650GX, Gulfstream Aerospace (GLF47)
A88D66 – G650, N650GX, Gulfstream Aerospace (GLF89)
A88D66 – G650, N650GX, Gulfstream Aerospace (GLF92)
A9285C – BE30, N69, FAA (FLC69)
A96FB1 – 707, N707MQ, Omega Air (OMEGA 71 on ATC)
A9CBA5 – G600, N730GD, Gulfstream Aerospace (GLF10)
A9F324 – G600, N740GD, Gulfstream Aerospace (GLF20)
A9F324 – G600, N740GD, Gulfstream Aerospace (GLF83)
AA86CF – G650, N289GA or N778AR, Gulfstream Aersopace (GLF14)
AADE67 – Bell 407, N8NR, Georgia Dept of Natural Resources
AB00B8 – DHC-8, N808MR, US Dept of Homeland Security
AC6751 – G450, N899FS, Bank of Utah Trustee (GLF62)
ADCCA3 – G550, N989AR, WFBN/Matone Promotora (GLF45)
ADFDC7 – C-130H3, 93-1561, 165th AW (DAWG10 on box, DAWG 61 on ATC)
ADFDC7 – C-130H3, 93-1561, 165th AW (EPIC 20 on box, DAWG 10 flight on ATC)
ADFDC7 – C-130H3, 93-1561, 165th AW (EPIC 20 on box, DAWG 61 on ATC)
ADFDEA – C-130H3, 94-6705, 165th AW (RCH840)
ADFDEC – C-130H3, 94-6707, 165th AW (DAWG 10 on ATC)
ADFDEC – C-130H3, 94-6707, 165th AW (DAWG12)
ADFDEC – C-130H3, 94-6707, 165th AW (JILL 11 on ATC)
ADFDEC – C-130H3, 94-6707, 165th AW (ROGUE30)
ADFDF9 – VC-25A, 92-9000, 89th AW
ADFE10 – HC-130H, 1704, CGAS Clearwater
ADFE51 – C-12V, 94-00322, OSACOM (PAT322)
ADFE54 – C-12V, 94-00325, WA ARNG (PAT002)
ADFE54 – C-12V, 94-00325, WA ARNG (PAT142)
ADFE97 – C-12V, 95-00098, 2-228th AVN (WING21)
ADFEA3 – C-130H, 96-7323, 130th AW (ANVIL75)
ADFEBA – C-32A, 99-0004, 89th AW (EXEC1F)
ADFED1 – C-12T, 85-01263, US Army (ARMY 51263 on ATC)
ADFEDE – C-12T, 86-00088, FL ARNG (PAT1088)
ADFEDE – C-12T, 86-00088, FL ARNG (PAT744A)
ADFF00 – C-12, 96-00112, CARA AVN Section
ADFF0C – KC-135R, 60-0335, 6th/927th AMW (PIRAT27)
ADFF0C – KC-135R, 60-0335, 6th/927th AMW (PIRAT32)
AE0110 – C-38A, 415700, VX-20 (SCORE27)
AE0157 – KC-135R, 58-0083, 151st ARW (EDDIE61)
AE0197 – C-21A, 84-0137, 375th AW (SPAR358)
AE01FE – T-6A, 98-3038, 14th FTW (VALOR 23 on ATC)
AE0244 – KC-135R, 63-8044, 914th ARW (BISON93)
AE025E – KC-135R, 61-0264, 121st ARW (EDDIE62)
AE0324 – C-130H, 74-1660, 374th AW
AE0359 – KC-135R, 57-1439, 6th/927th AMW (PIRAT26)
AE035C – KC-135T, 58-0062, 127th Wing (MOTOWN3)
AE036F – UC-35A, 98-00009, PATD
AE0377 – KC-135R, 62-3502, 6th/927th AMW (RCH1107)
AE03F8 – C-12T, 84-00154, LA ARNG (PAT0154)
AE0406 – C-37A, 99-0402, 86th AW
AE0422 – CN-235, 96-6044, 427th SOS (VIKING 99 on ATC
AE0423 – KC-135R, 59-1505, 134th ARW (SODA55)
AE0449 – C-32B, 02-4452, 150th SOS (YAHOO70)
AE0451 – C-2A, 162157, VRC-40
AE0457 – C-2A, 162174, VRC-40
AE0465 – C-2A, 162150, VRC-40
AE046D – C-2A, 162172, VRC-30
AE0477 – KC-135R, 58-0038, 914th ARW (BISON33)
AE0477 – KC-135R, 58-0038, 914th ARW (BISON81)
AE0478 – KC-135T, 58-0046, 6th AMW/927th ARW (PIRAT24)
AE04ED – KC-135R, 63-8035, 117th ARW (DIXIE10)
AE0500 – KC-135R, 59-1495, 155th ARW (HUSKR33)
AE05E1 – C-130H, 87-9285, 914th AW (RCH914 on box, PITT 85 on ATC)
AE05E2 – C-130H, 87-9287, 911th AW (RCH915)
AE05E3 – C-130H, 88-4401, 911th ARW (PITT01)
AE062B – KC-135R, 60-0353, 6th AMW/927th ARW (PIRAT36)
AE065F – KC-135T, 60-0346, 127th Wing (MOTOWN2)
AE0673 – KC-135R, 63-8027, 6th AMW/927th ARW (PIRAT35)
AE0677 – C-17A, 00-0172, 437th/315th AMW (VOLT43)
AE06E4 – UC-12M, 163836, MCAS Beaufort (FOX 836 on ATC)
AE06E4 – UC-12M, 163836, MCAS Beaufort (FOX 103 on ATC)
AE06E4 – UC-12M, 163836, MCAS Beaufort (FOX 836 on ATC)
AE074E – UC-12M, 163840, MCAS Beaufort (FOX 123 on ATC)
AE074E – UC-12M, 163840, MCAS Beaufort (FOX 466 on ATC)
AE074E – UC-12M, 163840, MCAS Beaufort (FOX 840 on ATC)
AE07B1 – KC-135R, 61-0288, 100th ARW (QID95)
AE07DB – C-17A, 93-0601, 62nd AW (RCH146)
AE07EF – C-17A, 96-0005, 105th AW (RCH291)
AE0811 – C-17A, 00-0175, 305th AMW (RCH416)
AE0888 – T-6A, 99-3555, 14th FTW (VALOR 82 on ATC)
AE08A9 – T-6A, 00-3588, 14th FTW (VALOR 06 on ATC)
AE08BE – C-17A, 00-0184, 62nd AW (RCH119T)
AE08F8 – C-12U, 84-24375, C/2-228 AVN (PAT581)
AE08FC – C-12U, 84-24379, A/2-228 AVN (MOHAWK99)
AE0940 – UC-35D, 166374, VMR Det – KADW (MARINE 374 on ATC)
AE0940 – UC-35D, 166374, VMR Det – KADW (VM374)
AE0CDB – UH-60A, 80-23490, US Army
AE10C1 – C-37A, 01, CGAS Washington (C101)
AE10EC – HC-130J, 2006, CGAS Elizabeth City (C2006)
AE1124 – T-6A, 02-3648, 14th FTW (VALOR 36 on ATC)
AE1127 – T-6A, 02-3651, 14th FTW (VALOR 25 on ATC)
AE115E – C-37A, 01-0030, 6th AMW (SPAR31)
AE1163 – C-130J, 02-8155, 403rd AW (REACH347)
AE1170 – C-17A, 02-1098, 305th AMW (CLAW23)
AE1171 – C-17A, 02-1099, 437th/315th (RCH525)
AE1192 – UC-35D, 166474, VMR-1 (LOBO462)
AE1192 – UC-35D, 166474, VMR-1 (LOBO474)
AE11DF – E-3B, 73-1675, 965th ACCS (SNTRY51)
AE11E1 – E-3C, 77-0353, 552nd ACW (SCOUT12H)
AE1211 – UC-35C, 03-00726, 2-228th AVN (PAT 501 on ATC)
AE123B – C-17A, 04-4130, 305th AMW (RCH4130)
AE123C – C-17A, 04-4131, 305th AMW (IROC33)
AE13E6 – C-12C, 78-23128, USASOC Flt Det
AE140A – T-6A, 05-3787, 14th FTW (VALOR 86 on ATC)
AE143A – UC-35D, 166715, VMR-1 (LOBO543)
AE143A – UC-35D, 166715, VMR-1 (LOBO715)
AE1441 – C-130J, 05-8152, 403rd AW (RCH286)
AE1458 – C-17A, 06-6154, 60h AMW (RCH150)
AE1459 – C-17A, 06-6155, 60th AMW (RCH132T)
AE146C – C-17A, 07-7174, 436th AW (RCH150)
AE1479 – UC-35D, 166767, MAW-4 (MARINE 767 on ATC)
AE1479 – UC-35D, 166767, MAW-4 (VM767)
AE151A – C-37B, 166377, VR-1 (VV101)
AE151A – C-37B, 166377, VR-1 (VV700)
AE152F – C-130J, 06-4631, 19th AW (RCHA612)
AE1D2A – P-3C, 160293, VP-30 (NAVY LL 52 on ATC)
AE1D5B – P-3C, 161415, VP-62 (VVTL621)
AE1DC0 – MH-60S, 167836, HSC-26
AE1ECD – T-6B, 166072, VT-6 (SHOOTER 072 on ATC)
AE20B6 – C-31A, 85-1608, US Army Golden Knights (GOLDEN KNIGHT 608 on ATC)
AE20C3 – C-17A, 07-7182, 437th/315th AW (IMPAC88)
AE20C7 – C-17A, 07-7186, 437th/315th AW (IMPAC89)
AE20C7 – C-17A, 07-7186, 437th/315th AW (MOOSE21)
AE2230 – P-8A, 167955, VX-1 (00000000 on box, PIONEER 40 on ATC)
AE223A – HC-144A, 2303, CGAS Cape Cod
AE265D – MH-65D, 6503, CGAS Atlantic City
AE2674 – MH-65D, 6526, CGAS Savannah
AE2679 – MH-65D, 6531, CGAS Savannah (CGNR6531)
AE2686 – MH-65D, 6547, CGAS Savannah (CGNR6547)
AE2699 – MH-65D, 6567, CGAS Savannah (CGNR6567)
AE26A8 – MH-65D, 6582, CGAS Detroit (CGNR6582)
AE2730 – C-27J, 2705, CGAS Elizabeth City (C2705)
AE291E – MC-12S-2, 08-0376, 305th MI Bn (AMBUSH 22 on ATC)
AE29FD – C-40A, 166694, VR-56 (CNV4376)
AE29FD – C-40A, 166694, VR-56 (CNV4954)
AE2F61 – MC-12S-2, 09-00642, 224th MI Bn (RONIN12)
AE2F61 – MC-12S-2, 09-00642, 224th MI Bn (SHADY11)
AE2F61 – MC-12S-2, 09-00642, 224th MI Bn (SHADY18)
AE2F61 – MC-12S-2, 09-00642, 224th MI Bn (SHADY29)
AE2F61 – MC-12S-2, 09-00642, 224th MI Bn (SHADY31)
AE2F61 – MC-12S-2, 09-00642, 224th MI Bn (SHADY92)
AE2F9C – KC-130J, 168070, VMGR-252 (OTIS39)
AE2FA8 – C-17A, 08-8196, 62nd AW (RCH492)
AE49C3 – C-17A, 09-9207, 15th AS(EAGLE77)
AE4AE8 – C-32A, 09-0016, 89th AW
AE4BDC – C-130J, 08-5705, 317th AG (RCHA612)
AE4C62 – MC-12S-2, 10-00742, 224 MI Bn (SHADY23)
AE4C62 – MC-12S-2, 10-00742, 224 MI Bn (SHADY27)
AE4C62 – MC-12S-2, 10-00742, 224th MI Bn (SHADY25)
AE4D9B – UV-18C, 10-80262, US Army Golden Knights (GKA262)
AE4E0D – C-130J, 11-57400, 19th AW (AEGIS71)
AE4E12 – C-130J, 11-5752, 19th AW (RCHA612)
AE4EB2 – (00000000 on box, TALON 07 on ATC)
AE4EB2 – P-8A, 168428, VP-16 (00000000 on box, TALON 12 on ATC)
AE4EB2 – P-8A, 168428, VP-16 (TALON 49 on ATC)
AE4EB2 – P-8A, 168428, VP-16 (TALON75)
AE4EB2 – P-8A, 168428, VP-16 (TALON90)
AE4EB4 – P-8A, 168430, VP-26 (00000000 on box, TRIDENT 57 on ATC)
AE4EB4 – P-8A, 168430, VP-26 (TRDNT22)
AE4EB4 – P-8A, 168430, VP-26 (TRIDENT 57 on ATC)
AE4EB5 – P-8A, 168431, VP-10 (LANCR22)
AE4EB5 – P-8A, 168431, VP-10 (LANCR24)
AE4EB5 – P-8A, 168431, VP-10 (LANCR61)
AE4EB5 – P-8A, 168431, VP-26 (LANCR61)
AE4EB8 – P-8A, 168434, VP-45 (00000000 on box, PELICAN 02 on ATC)
AE4EB8 – P-8A, 168434, VP-45 (GRIFN22)
AE4EB8 – P-8A, 168434, VP-45 (PELCN77)
AE4EB9 – P-8A, 168435, VP-30 (VVLL800)
AE4EBE – P-8A, 168440, VP-45 (PELCN57)
AE4EC1 – P-8A, 168756, VP-45 (00000000 on box, PELICAN 21 on ATC)
AE4EC1 – P-8A, 168756, VP-45 (PELCN45)
AE4EC6 – P-8A, 168761, VP-45 (00000000 on box, PELICAN 56 on ATC)
AE4EC6 – P-8A, 168761, VP-45 (00000000 on box, PELICAN 77 on ATC)
AE4EC6 – P-8A, 168761, VP-45 (00000000)
AE4EC7 – P-8A, 168762, VP-16 (00000000 on box, TALON 68 on ATC)
AE4EC8 – P-8A, 168763, VP-10 (LANCER1)
AE4EC8 – P-8A, 168763, VP-10 (LANCR27)
AE4EC8 – P-8A, 168763, VP-10 (LANCR55)
AE4EC8 – P-8A, 168763, VP-10 (LANCR88)
AE509D – UV-18C, 08-00263, US Army Golden Knights (GKA263)
AE509F – MH-65D, 6544, CGAS Savannah
AE54D1 – HC-130J, 12-5768, 71st RQS (KING15)
AE5718 – C-40A, 168980, VR-58 (CNV4677)
AE57B4 – P-8A, 168848, VP-26 (00000000 on box, TRIDENT 02 on ATC)
AE57B4 – P-8A, 168848, VP-26 (TRIDENT 33 on ATC)
AE57B7 – P-8A, 168851, VP-26 (TRIDENT 34 on ATC)
AE57B8 – P-8A, 168852, VP-30 (VVLL854)
AE57B8 – P-8A, 168852, VP-30 (VVLL858)
AE57B9 – P-8A, 168853, VP-16 (TALON19)
AE57B9 – P-8A, 168853, VP-16 (TALON22)
AE57BC – P-8A, 168856, VP-30 (VVLL801)
AE57BC – P-8A, 168856, VP-30 (VVLL818)
AE57BC – P-8A, 168856, VP-30 (VVLL897)
AE57C0 – P-8A, 168860, VP-10 (TALON91)
AE57C0 – P-8A, 168860, VP-16 (TALON02)
AE57C5 – P-8A, 169000, VP-45 (00000000 on box, PELICAN 11 on ATC)
AE57C5 – P-8A, 169000, VP-45 (00000000)
AE57C5 – P-8A, 169000, VP-45 (PELCN02)
AE57C5 – P-8A, 169000, VP-45 (PELCN91)
AE57C6 – P-8A, 169001, VP-30 (VVLL871)
AE57C7 – P-8A, 169002, VP-30 (00000000)
AE57CB – P-8A, 169006, VP-45 (00000000 on box, PELICAN 18 on ATC)
AE57CB – P-8A, 169006, VP-45 (00000000)
AE57CB – P-8A, 169006, VP-45 (PELICAN 03 on ATC, no ADS-B)
AE57D1 – HC-130J, 2007, CGAS Elizabeth City (C2007)
AE58B5 – MC-12S, 11-00268, 224th MI Bn
AE58B5 – MC-12S, 11-00268, 224th MI Bn (SHADY 23 on ATC)
AE58B5 – MC-12S, 11-00268, 224th MI Bn (SHADY 27 on ATC)
AE5C58 – P-8A, 169326, VP-30 (VLL829 on box, NAVY LL 833 on ATC)
AE5C58 – P-8A, 169326, VP-30 (VVLL808)
AE5C58 – P-8A, 169326, VP-30 (VVLL811)
AE5C58 – P-8A, 169326, VP-30 (VVLL829)
AE5C58 – P-8A, 169326, VP-30 (VVLL869)
AE5C5A – P-8A, 169328, VP-30 (VVLL813)
AE5C5A – P-8A, 169328, VP-30 (VVLL895)
AE5C5B – P-8A, 168329, VP-30 (LL803)
AE5C5B – P-8A, 168329, VP-30 (VVLL829)
AE5C5B – P-8A, 168329, VP-30 (VVLL860)
AE5C5C – P-8A, 169330, VP-30 (VVLL800)
AE5C5C – P-8A, 169330, VP-30 (VVLL812)
AE5C5C – P-8A, 169330, VP-30 (VVLL822)
AE5C5C – P-8A, 169330, VP-30 (VVLL891)
AE5C5E – P-8A, 169332, VP-26 (00000000 on box, TRIDENT 12 on ATC)
AE5C5E – P-8A, 169332, VP-26 (TRIDENT 15 on ATC) (no ADS-B)
AE5C5E – P-8A, 169332, VP-26 (TRIDENT 33 on ATC)
AE5C5E – P-8A, 169332, VP-26 (TRIDENT 34 on ATC)
AE5C60 – P-8A, 169334, VP-30 (LL814)
AE5C60 – P-8A, 169334, VP-30 (VVLL803)
AE5C60 – P-8A, 169334, VP-30 (VVLL869)
AE5C60 – P-8A, 169334, VP-30 (VVLL897)
AE5F07 – C-37, 202, US Coast Guard (C202)
AE5F07 – C-37A, 202, US Coast Guard (C202)
C02045 – C90A, C-FMFS, RCAF 3 CFFTS

The First Sentry Savannah Exercise of 2018 is Underway

Savannah – It’s late January/early February so that means it’s once again time for a Sentry Savannah exercise. For this iteration, there are fourteen F-22As from the 43rd FS at Tyndall AFB, ten T-38s from the 2nd FTS at Tyndall AFB, and seven F/A-18Es from VFA-143 at NAS Oceana. They all arrived at the Air Dominance Center at Savannah-Hilton Head IAP at the end of last week and over the weekend and the exercise began this Monday. For what it’s worth, these are the same players as the Sentry Savannah exercise that occurred in January/February 2017. As usual, the exercise centers around air-to-air combat activity in the special use areas off of the South Carolina, Georgia, and Florida coasts. The visiting units are being joined in the offshore airspace by local southeastern units: F-16CMs from the 169th FW at McEntire JNGB and F-15Cs from the 125th FW at Jacksonville IAP. Some F-15Cs from the 159th FW at JRB New Orleans have also been participating, but it sounded like they may have gone home this afternoon based on their routing after they left Savannah-Hilton Head IAP. Over the last few days, some of the 125th FW F-15s and the 159th FW F-15s were coming to Savannah between the morning and afternoon sorties then returning to Jacksonville IAP after the afternoon sorties. The morning sorties have been taking off around 0930 and the afternoon sorties around 1330. The fighter activity has been supported by two KC-135s from the 134th ARW from McGhee Tyson ANGB and the 155th ARW at Lincoln ANGB. This afternoon, a 117th ARW KC-135 from Birmingham ANGB also supported the fighters. Sentry Savannah usually lasts for a couple of weeks, so you’ll still be hearing them in the skies overhead for a while. If you’re interested in listening to them on the radio, you can if you have a scanner or other radio gear that will pick up the 225-400 MHz range in AM mode; here’s what to listen for:

 

Frequencies
119.100/257.800 – Savannah IAP Tower
120.400/353.775 – Savannah Approach/Departure
125.300/371.875 – Savannah Approach/Departure
118.400/307.225 – Savannah Approach/Departure

269.550/124.700 – Jax Center Columbia Low
281.550 – Jax Center Georgetown High
282.200/124.675 – Jax Center Jekyll Low
282.300/135.975 – Jax Center Alma High
285.650/126.125 – Jax Center Statesboro High
363.200/132.925 – Jax Center Allendale/Savannah Low

120.950/284.500 – Sealord North Primary
133.950/267.500 – Sealord South Primary

288.400 – NORAD Discrete; Check-In
293.600 – NORAD Discrete; Blue Air
316.300 – NORAD Discrete; Red Air
265.400 – NORAD Discrete; Aerial Refueling
278.000 – Aerial Refueling

237.000 – ADC Ops; 43rd FS Ops
256.850 – 43rd FS Air-to-Air
288.900 – 43rd FS Air-to-Air
352.100 – 43rd FS Air-to-Air

290.000 – Old VMFA-251 Tac 1; 2nd FTS Ops
320.600 – 2nd FTS Air-to-Air

350.657 – North TACTS Range; VFA-143 Base
268.500 – VMFA-143 Tac

298.300 – 169th FW Ops
141.825 – 169th FW V14
140.125 – 169th FW V15

251.250 – 125th FW Ops
234.800 – 125th FW Aux 5
253.700 – 125th FW Aux 6

314.300 – 159th FW Air-to-Air

 

Callsigns
RAPTOR ## (F-22A, 43rd FS)
SAVAGE ## (F-22A, 43rd FS)
STINGER ## (F-22A, 43rd FS)

BEAGLE ## (T-38, 2nd FTS)
HOUND ## (T-38, 2nd FTS)

GRIFFIN ## (F/A-18E, VFA-143)
TAPROOM ## (F/A-18E, VFA-143)

MACE ## (F-16CM, 169th FW)

FANG ## (F-15C, 125th FW)
GATOR ## (F-15C, 125th FW)

JAZZ ## (F-15C, 159th FW)

HUSKER 33 (KC-135R, 59-1495, 155th ARW)
SODA 55 (KC-135R, 59-1505, 134th ARW)

Amateur Radio and History for February 2018

History related Amateur Radio special event stations in February 2018 include stations related to an aircraft crash in Ireland (continued from January), King Hussein of Jordan, the Treaty of Guadalupe-Hidalgo, the Space Shuttle Columbia, the Battle of Iwo Jima in World War II, the Civil War submarine Hunley, and a shipwreck in 1918. There will also be special event stations remembering President George Washington, but I thought my readers would be familiar enough with him that I wouldn’t need to write a paragraph about him.

Special event station EI50AOM will operate in Baltimore, County Cork, Ireland from 1 January 2018 to 31 March 2018 in remembrance of the 50th anniversary of the crash of Aer Lingus Flight 712. The callsign combines the aircraft’s registration with the 50th Anniversary of the crash. Aer Lingus Flight 712, a Vickers Viscount 803 with Irish registration EI-AOM crashed on 24 March 2017 near Tuskar Rock, County Wexford, Ireland with 57 passengers and 4 crew aboard; all 61 perished in the crash. The cause of Flight 712’s crash has never been determined. Initial investigations into the crash were not thorough so the crash has been surrounded by controversy. One theory that evolved was that Flight 712 was downed by a missile from a testing facility at RAF Aberporth in Wales; another theory was that it crashed as a result of a collision with an Irish Air Corps training aircraft. A more thorough investigation in 2002 determined that Flight 712 crashed as the result of a mechanical failure stemming from metal fatigue, corrosion, control surface flutter, or a bird strike. Of the 61 fatalities, the remains of only 14 were ever found. EI50AOM will be devoting one day of operations to each person lost in the crash.

EI50AOM will be operating on or around 21.317, 18.127, 14.217, and 7.127. QSL via Tim McKnight, EI2KA, Gortadrohid, Ringarogy Island, Baltimore, Co. Cork, Ireland. For more information, see:  https://www.qrz.com/db/ei50aom

 

A variety of stations will be operating as special event stations during the month of February in memory of King Hussein bin Talal of Jordan. For more information on participating stations, see the JY1 Special Event Memorial Station website. King Hussein ruled Jordan through a tumultuous portion of Jordan’s history from 1952 to 1999. Throughout his reign, King Hussein found himself in an unenviable position, both geographically and policy-wise; he was between Israel and the west on one side and the Palestinians, other Islamic and Arab nations, and the Soviet Bloc on the other. Regardless, his reign was a positive one; Jordan was better off when he passed than when he ascended to the throne. Quality of life and literacy in Jordan, its economy, and its infrastructure all improved throughout his reign. King Hussein was an enthusiastic amateur radio operator, active under the callsign JY1, so an amateur radio special event station in his honor is a fitting way to remember such a historic leader.

JY1 special event stations will be operating on or around 14.250, 14.025, 7.185,  and 7.025. QSL via Ayman J. Azar, 8261 Decatur St, Lake Station, IN 46405.

 

Special event station K7T will operate in Tucson, AZ on 3 February 2018 to commemorate the signing of the Treaty of Guadalupe-Hidalgo, which ended the Mexican American War of 1846-1848. In addition to monetary settlements, the treaty ceded to the United States from Mexico territory that would eventually part of 10 western states. Controversy over whether those territories and states would be free or slave would help lead to the Civil War just over a decade later.

K7T will be operating on or around 14.250, 14.070, 7.200, and 7.070. QSL via Oro Valley ARC, via e-mail only to, hfsig@tucsosnhamradio.org for PDF. No paper QSLs, please. Email hfsig@tucsosnhamradio.org for PDF certificate. www.tucsonhamradio.org

 

The Nacogdoches Amateur Radio Club will be operating special event station K5C on 3 and 4 February 2018 in memory of the astronauts that perished in the shuttle Columbia crash and in honor of the amateur radio operators who assisted in recovery efforts. Columbia was returning from the STS-107 mission when it disintegrated over Texas and Louisiana killing all aboard: Rick Husband, William McCool, Michael Anderson, Kalpana Chawla, David Brown, Laurel Clark, and Ilan Ramon. It was determined that the cause of the crash was by hot atmospheric damage penetrating Columbia’s heat shield and damaging its structural integrity through damage caused pieces of foam insulation that came off of the external fuel tank during launch. After the crash, a multitude of volunteers responded to the area to help search for debris, which was spread across a massive area. Among those volunteers were amateur radio operators who provided key communications support for the search.

K5C will be active on or around 21.350, 14.270, and 7.220. QSL via Nacogdoches Amateur Radio Club, 167 CR 2093, Nacogdoches, TX 75965. w5nac.com

 

On 10 February 2018, NI6IW at the USS Midway (CV-41) in San Diego, CA will operate as a special event station in commemoration of the US Marine Corps raising the American flag on Mt. Suribachi during the Battle for Iwo Jima. The invasion of Iwo Jima began on 19 February 1945 with the goal of depriving the Japanese the use of its airfields and utilizing them as emergency landing fields for B-29s that were attacking Japan from the Marianas. Mt. Suribachi was the islands high ground and the Japanese were tunneled into it with firepower that could range the island, so it was an important early target. It was taken on 23 February 1945 and on that day the iconic Joe Rosenthal’s photo of the flag being raised was taken. Rosenthal’s photo, however, was of the second raising; a small flag had been raised first and Rosenthal captured the image of the second group of Marines replacing it with a larger flag.

NI6IW will be active on or around 14.320 and 7.250, on PSK31 on 14.070, and on D-STAR on REF001C. QSL via USS Midway (Cv-41) COMEDTRA, 910 N Harbor Drive, San Diego, CA 92101.

 

The Trident Amateur Radio Club will be operating special event station N4HLH from Charleston, SC on 17 February 2018 in commemoration of the submarine Hunley sinking the USS Housatonic in Charleston Harbor during the Civil War. The Hunley was built in Mobile, AL and transported to Charleston, where she sank twice during testing, killing 13 crew members. On 17 February 1864, the Hunley attacked the USS Housatonic at the entrance of Charleston Harbor in an attempt to break the Union blockade of the city.; it was the first successful attack by a submarine on a surface ship, using her spar torpedo. The Housatonic sank in five minutes, but the Hunley did not survive the attack either, sinking after the torpedo exploded. There is some debate about how the Hunley‘s crew died, but they likely died due to blast injury caused when the spar torpedo exploded (the spar torpedo being too far away from the rest of the submarine to prevent damage).  The Hunley wasn’t located until 1995 and was raised in 2000; she is now on display at the Warren Lasch Conservation Center in Charleston, SC.

N4HLH will be active on or around 28.462, 14.262, 7.262, and 7.117 as well as the SC Hearts linked repeater system. QSL via Brian Freedman W4BFZ, PO Box 60732, North Charleston, SC 29419. A certificate is $5 and SASE 9X12 envelope. For QSL send card and SASE. tridenthams.org/hunley.htm

 

The Society of Newfoundland Amateurs will be operating special event station VO1MZL from St. John’s, Newfoundland on 23 and 24 February 2018 in memory of the sinking of the SS Florizel. Commissioned in 1909, the SS Florizel was a passenger liner specially designed for traveling through icy water and was the flagship of the Red Cross Line. On 23 February 1918, she left port in St. John’s, Newfoundland en route to New York with 78 passengers and 68 crew aboard. The Chief Engineer ignored the Captain’s orders for full speed in order to prolong the voyage enough to result in a layover at Halifax where he could visit family, as a result, the Captain ordered a turn too early and the ship ran into rocks at Horn Head Point. Most of the survivors took shelter in the ship’s Marconi Shack, from which an SOS message was sent. Despite the SOS and subsequent rescue efforts, only 44 survived the crash. The special event callsign, VO1MZL is based on the Florizel‘s callsign MZL.

VO1MZL will be operating on or around 14.200 (hopefully they move up a bit for us General-class hams). QSL via Admiralty House Communications Museum, 365 Old Placentia Road, Mount Pearl, NL A1N0G7, Canada. http://www.admiraltymuseum.ca/

 

It’s also worth mentioning that NASA’s Amateur Radio Clubs will be on the air throughout 2018 as part of a year-long special event “NASA on the Air.” They’ll be commemorating events such as the 60th anniversary of NASA’s founding on 29 July 1958, the 20th anniversary of the launch of the first element of the International Space Station on 20 November 1998, the 20th anniversary of the launch of the International Space Station’s Node 1 on 4 December 1998, and the 50th anniversary of Apollo 8’s launch on 21 December 1968 and splashdown on 27 December 1968. The clubs will also be on the air for other occasions throughout the year. You can keep up with the events and when the clubs will be on the air by checking their website or following NASA Radio Clubs on Twitter.

 


 

If you’re interested in reading more about the events encompassed by this month’s special event stations, here are some that I’ve read and suggest:

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